Outdoor Vitals Summit 30 Degree Budget Down Sleeping Bag Review

Outdoor Vitals Summit 30 Degree Budget Down Sleeping Bag Review The Summit line are Outdoor Vitals flagship down sleeping bags, filled with 800 fill power downy goodness. Just looking at […]

Outdoor Vitals Summit 30 Degree Budget Down Sleeping Bag Review

The Summit line are Outdoor Vitals flagship down sleeping bags, filled with 800 fill power downy goodness. Just looking at this sleeping bag makes you all warm inside…  and that’s before you climb inside.

Outdoor Vitals Summit 30 down sleeping bag review

Overall

All in all, the Outdoor Vitals Summit 30° down sleeping bag is a good choice if you need a very warm and well made down sleeping bag, but don’t want to spend $300+ for a similar sleeping bag from the North Face, Marmott, Kelty, Big Agnes, REI, Sea to Summit, Nemo, etc. I feel these are more than just budget sleeping bags. As a gear reviewer it is not unusual for met to test gear for a review, then never touch it again. It is just the nature of having new gear arrive for review regularly. I liked the Summit down bag enough that it will continue to see some 3 season work in both my backpacking as well as my car camping setups. It has proven to me that it can handle a wide range of overnight lows.

Gears rating

Gear Score
Gearswww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.com
Outdoor Vitals successfully walks a fine line with the Summit 30 down sleeping bags. They are full featured, well made, and very warm while keeping the price well below what one might expect to pay for a similar down sleeping bag from big name brands.

Where to buy

Outdoor Vitals sells direct on their website or via marketplaces like:

First Impressions – OV Summit 30 Degree Down Sleeping Bag

This is a nice looking sleeping bag with black rip-stop outer and grey rip-stop inner. The Summit down sleeping bag is very puffy and lofty, topping out around 6” of loft around the body. Near the feet the loft is closer to 9”. Not sure if Outdoor Vitals puts over stuff in the feet on the assumption that is where most people want it. Or if this was a settling, shifting down issue and it is supposed to be evenly distributed. Regardless, this way you can avoid cold feet.

The OV Summit is a mummy shaped sleeping bag with a hood, typical hood drawstring and another drawstring about shoulder height. A draft blocking baffle runs along the length of the side zipper. To say that this sleeping bag is full featured would be the truth. The box baffle design does a good job to keep the down where it needs to be.

The OV sleeping bag came with an ample sized stuff sack with compression straps, which is a nice addition in a budget down sleeping bag.

Outdoor Vitals Summit 30 down sleeping bag review - compression stuff sacks

Testing the Outdoor Vitals down sleeping bag

I received the Long version of the Summit 30° sleeping bag for review right as I had a big trip coming up that would afford me the ability to sleep in a tent as well as my hammock. So, I thought this would be the perfect addition based on the predicted overnight temps.

Summit down sleeping bag specs

From the Outdoor Vitals website:

Material 20D Ripstop Degree 30°F(-1°C)
Insulation 800 Fill Power Storm Loft Stuff Sack Compressible
Zipper 2 Way YKK Stuff Size 7×7 sq in
Shoulder Circumference Long 70”

Short 66″

Regular 66″

Bag Length Short 69″

Regular 75″

Long 81″

Weight (Add 3oz compression sack) Short 2 lbs

Regular 2 lbs 3 oz

Long 2 lbs 7 oz

Actual OV Summit 30 down sleeping bag weights

Outdoor Vitals Summit 30 down sleeping bag review

Yeah. You read that right. The Long bag was right at the advertised weight, but weighed less than the shorter Regular length sleeping bag. The Regular sized bag was a full 5oz heavier than advertised. That means an extra 5 oz of 800FP down. Good for us, assuming the extra weight isn’t an issue.

Tayson, the big cheese at Outdoor Vitals told Jeff that the early batch of sleeping bags from one supplier were sometimes a bit off on weight. Sounded like they always erred on the side of putting in MORE down than they were supposed to, which is better than not enough. However, Outdoor Vitals switched to a new supplier with better QC systems and also only “…using certified 800+ fill power down [that] is both responsibly sourced and DWR treated” since early 2017 (according to Jeff’s notes).

Outdoor Vitals down sleeping bag field test results

I took the Summit 30° down sleeping bag to HangCon 2018, a 3 night annual gathering of hammock campers in Florida. Overnight lows ranged from 60°F on down to 35°F. It may sound odd that I get excited when a cold front passes through and I am testing camping gear. However, it sure is convenient to have markedly different temperatures each night so that I can better understand how the gear performs in different conditions. I personally do not subscribe to the 10° safety barrier of sleeping bags (i.e. a 30° bag is only warm down to 40°). If it says 30° then it needs to get me there.  

The first night was spent in a pre-production Tentsile Stealth tree tent (full review coming soon) with their custom Klymit SkyPad mattress. The Summit down sleeping bag did well that first night in the tree tent at a balmy 60°. My only complaint is that I felt that the bag was tight around my shoulders. This might be because I mostly hammock camp and use top quilts instead of sleeping bags.

Outdoor Vitals Summit 30 down sleeping bag review Tentsile Stealth

The second night was much colder down around the 40° mark and the bag still kept me warm in the Tentsile Stealth. The Skypad sleeping pad was a different story (R4.4 insulation value notwithstanding), but we will save that for a different review.  I chose not to use the Outdoor Vitals sleeping bag liner.

Outdoor Vitals Summit 30 down sleeping bag review Tentsile skypad

The third night, fearing that I would be cold from the pad with lows projected around freezing, I switched over to my trusty Nubé hammock (full review) . I found out the next morning that the low was indeed below freezing, bottoming out at a brisk 28°. I must say that I was not cold at any point in the night.

Outdoor Vitals Summit 30 down sleeping bag review Nube hammock

Another feature of the Outdoor Vitals Summit 30° down sleeping bag is that the zipper does not go all the way to the footbox. It stops about upper calf on my body. I should note that this sleeping bag was ordered for Gear Report’s Editor, Jeff, who is 6’4″ tall… so this is the “Long” version. The zipper not extending all the way to the bottom of the sleeping bag was a bit of a hindrance in the Tentsile tree tent, but man was it a great length for the hammock. You guessed it… unzipped the OV Summit down sleeping bag was like a big, glorious hammock top quilt!Outdoor Vitals Summit 30 down sleeping bag review - bag unzipped

Trip number 2 used this bag as my top insulation in a hammock. I admit in planning for this trip I did not do my best job at looking at the weather. Lows were forecasted around freezing for both nights. What I did not notice was that the day before the low was 15°. I ended up taking the Summit 30° and a 0° underquilt on the trip. While I was not toasty warm that night with a low of 18°, I was not cold! The second night was like a heat wave came through camp and the low only dropped to 28°. While I don’t suggest that this bag is really a 15° or 20° bag, because your results may vary, for me it was more than adequate to keep me warm at it’s stated 30° rating.

What Could be Better about the Outdoor Vitals sleeping bag?

As with all down sleeping bags, the longer that they stay compressed, the more the down becomes damaged. I would have liked for this bag to have come with a large, breathable storage sack for uncompressed storage.

The bag to me feels a bit narrow as a sleeping bag and a bit large as a hammock top quilt. It’s not like I’m obese either. Jeff noticed the same thing when he briefly tried the bag.

It is not really an apples to apples comparison with my 800 fill 20° hammock topquilt, as mummy bags and hammock top quilts are designed differently. Top quilts intentionally have less surface area since the other half is secured to the outside of the hammock. However, the OV sleeping bag about 18 oz heavier. It is not the lightest bag on the market and I would like to see it lighten up a bit.

Might be nice if an option were available to purchase with the Nikwax Down Proof waterproof treatment already applied. Obviously, as with any down sleeping bag, it MUST be kept dry. Down loses loft and insulation ability when it gets wet. Down Proof helps to shed water from the down fibers so they don’t clump together and lose the ability to trap heat.

Outdoor Vitals Summit 30 down sleeping bag review

Overall

All in all, the Outdoor Vitals Summit 30° down sleeping bag is a good choice if you need a very warm and well made down sleeping bag, but don’t want to spend $300+ for a similar sleeping bag from the North Face, Marmott, Kelty, Big Agnes, REI, Sea to Summit, Nemo, etc. I feel these are more than just budget sleeping bags. As a gear reviewer it is not unusual for met to test gear for a review, then never touch it again. It is just the nature of having new gear arrive for review regularly. I liked the Summit down bag enough that it will continue to see some 3 season work in both my backpacking as well as my car camping setups. It has proven to me that it can handle a wide range of overnight lows.

Gears rating

Gear Score
Gearswww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.com
Outdoor Vitals successfully walks a fine line with the Summit 30 down sleeping bags. They are full featured, well made, and very warm while keeping the price well below what one might expect to pay for a similar down sleeping bag from big name brands.

Where to buy

Outdoor Vitals sells direct on their website or via marketplaces like:

How Gear Report obtained these Outdoor Vitals sleeping bags

*Outdoor Vitals provided Summit sleeping bags in regular and long lengths for Jeff and Randall‘s trek at Philmont Scout Ranch in July, 2017. However, on the very first attempt to sleep in it Jeff quickly realized that he is allergic to down (which likely means Randall is also) and they were not able to use these OV sleeping bags on the trek. Thankfully, Chris stepped up to complete to review and test the long version Outdoor Vitals Summit 30 degree down sleeping bag. For more on the gear used on the 100 mile, 11 day trek through the mountains of New Mexico, check out our guide to budget backpacking gear.

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About Chris G

Chris G. - Camping Gear Review Specialist Following in Jeff's footsteps and connecting with Gear Reports roots, Chris G is establishing himself as our resident camping, backpacking and hammock specialist. No one is sure when he actually writes reviews, as he seems to post pictures from remote backpacking camp locations 24/7/365. While much of the crew at Gear Report have branched out into firearms, Chris remains focused on all things camping.