DIY Archive

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Hiperfire Hipertouch TH24 Tarheel 3 Gun Competition AR15 AR10 Trigger Preview

The skinny on Hiperfire One of our favorite triggers from our Big AR Trigger Upgrade review was the Hiperfire Hipertouch 24C trigger … the Competition model with the distinctive Hipershoe. When Terry at […]
Hiperfire Hipertouch TH24 tarheel 24 trigger upgrade - Carolina Blue Hipershoe detail

Carolina Blue Hipershoe

The skinny on Hiperfire

One of our favorite triggers from our Big AR Trigger Upgrade review was the Hiperfire Hipertouch 24C trigger … the Competition model with the distinctive Hipershoe. When Terry at Hiperfire told me that he had a new trigger coming out soon that would be BETTER than the 24C, I wondered if he was high on … well, whatever it is that Engineers get high on. After all, the 24C caused such a stir among the Gear Report test team that I was in fear for my well being when deciding how to dispose of that trigger when testing was done. Lets just say that there were no shortage of hands that went up when I asked who would like to keep the Hipertouch 24C for extended testing.

Magic coatings

We saw in our AR Fire Control Group testing that WMD Guns turned a clunky stock mil-spec trigger into a very respectable fire control group by applying Nickel Boron to all of the non-spring parts and doing a bit of polishing. So, it should not have surprised me to see that Hiperfire had done much the same in coating the 24C with an un-named “secret sauce” Nickel alloy based finish, and called it the Hiperfire Hipertouch TH24 Tarheel 3 Gun Competition Trigger. Hiperfire doesn’t disclose that the plating is NiB-X. However, that is what it looks like to me.

Hiperfire Hipertouch TH24 tarheel 24 trigger upgrade - package

Hiperfire Hipertouch TH24 tarheel 24 trigger

Hiperfire says that the TarHeel TH24 trigger:

  • is smoother, so the shooter feels greater control and confidence, improving accuracy
  • is more responsive and more pleasurable to shoot
  • extends trigger life via reduced wear, since the plating is hard and somewhat lubricious.
  • absorbs lubrication into plating surface matrix
  • is easier to clean carbon fouling
  • provides better corrosion protection than parkerizing
  • offers better looks, although color will darken with use

I found the intro video on the Hiperfire site to be a list of great features, mixed with a few negating statements that make it clear that Hiperfire wasn’t initially convinced that coating a Hiperfire 24C would make a difference. My expectations are that the Hipertouch TH24 will feel nearly identical to the Hiperfire 24C competition trigger.

Hiperfire Hipertouch TH24 tarheel 24 trigger upgrade - ready to install 2

Hiperfire Hipertouch TH24 tarheel 24 trigger upgrade – ready to install

Set it up!

I installed the Hiperfire Hipertouch TH24 in the new WMD Guns Big Beast .308 WMD-10 (AR10) for initial testing. Installation is identical to the Hiperfire 24C, so check out this video to see how it is done. The Hiperfire 24 series triggers look a bit complex, but aren’t really that hard to install at all. Besides, Hiperfire provides the best instructions I have seen, rivaled only by LaserMax (they also have awesome printed instructions… but I digress). The only tool that I use is a little alignment pin from the Hiperfire Hipertouch EDT installation kit. It is not required, but makes it easier to align the trigger group and the hammer with their respective pins. If you are new at this and take your time following the instructions to the letter, including watching the video(s), then you are probably looking at at 30 minute install. And you really should take your time since there are a couple of critical things, like the orientation of the toggles relative to the toggle pin, that you really don’t want to get wrong. Once you understand how the Hipertouch 24 series triggers go together, you can probably remove a mil-spec trigger group and install the TH24 trigger in about 5 minutes. I chose to install the heaviest toggle springs in the TH24, so I expect trigger pull to measure about 3 – 3.5 lbs.

As you can see in the pictures, the Big Beast is pretty much totally coated in NiB-X on all visible surfaces… and even some of the hidden ones, like the trigger well and mag well. While we have a variety of lowers that we could install the Hiperfire TH24 in, I chose the AR10 not because the Nickel finishes match, but rather because:

  • The stock trigger in the Big Beast is a fully coated and polished mil-spec trigger, as mentioned above (the one mentioned above was from the WMD Beast lower, not this Big Beast), but it seemed to be the weakest link on the solid WMD-10 platform. I am a big fan of the Hipertouch 24C trigger and can’t wait to feel how the Hipertouch TH24 feels in the AR10.
  • To show that Hiperfire triggers fit in AR10 rifles, not just the smaller AR15 platform rifles.
  • Because the Big Beast is our workhorse for testing various night vision and normal optics, so it will be used a lot.
  • And yes, also because the finishes match. While I am not a slave to fashion, I do appreciate the ability to color coordinate my rifle with my trigger. :)

How we will test the TH24

Hiperfire TH24 tarheel 3 gun trigger - tarheel 3-gunMuch of the testing will be opportunistic, as it is installed in one of our testbed ARs. As we shoot the WMD-10, we will also note how the Hiperfire Hipertouch TH24 feels and operates. However, we will do the obligatory hammer drop block testing and trigger pull weight testing.

Tarheel 3-Gun

Gear Report is located in Central North Carolina, the heart of 3-Gun country, in large part, due to the efforts of groups like Tarheel 3-gun. We look forward to checking in with the folks at Tarheel 3-gun as part of this review. The TH24 came about at the request of Tarheel 3-gun. It is my understanding that they insisted on a Carolina blue trigger. Please understand, if you aren’t blessed to live in the Tarheel state, that the exact shade of Carolina blue associated with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is what many North Carolinians refer to as “Carolina Blue”. The blue on the hipershoe is close, but a bit too dark. :(

hiperfire AR15 AR10 trigger upgradeHiperfire

As noted in our AR Trigger Test Preview, Terry Bender, the Hiperfire CEO wasn’t just willing to pit his triggers against the competition, he was EAGER. While every other manufacturer in our big AR Trigger test sent one model of trigger for evaluation, Hiperfire sent all 5 current production triggers. Well, Terry is back at it again, this time with the new TH24 Tarheel 3-Gun trigger. Terry, a graduate degreed mechanical engineer by training, created a very innovative design for the 24C series triggers, adjusting the geometry and mechanisms within the AR trigger group. My experience with the complete line of Hiperfire 24 triggers is consistent with how Terry describes them: “The triggers are differentiated best by the amount of creep to meet any preference.” However, I would add that the ability to dial in the trigger pull weight by swapping the springs is a great added feature.

Huge thanks to Ammunition Supply Company, who kicked in 3 types of .308 ammo for testing the WMD Guns WMD-10, that houses the Hiperfire TH24.

You can read more about the hiperfire AR15 AR10 trigger upgrade and the other triggers in the test in our full AR trigger upgrade review.

More pictures of the Hiperfire Hipertouch TH24 Tarheel 3 Gun Competition Trigger:

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Grip-Key Key Organizer Review

What is a Grip-Key? Grip-Key is a Kydex polymer key organizer that allows you to stabilize, align, and organize your personal array of keys, giving you a compact Swiss-Army knife style sandwich […]

GripKeyWhat is a Grip-Key?

Grip-Key is a Kydex polymer key organizer that allows you to stabilize, align, and organize your personal array of keys, giving you a compact Swiss-Army knife style sandwich with your keys neatly stored inside.

A product in search of a need?

Grip-Key says that their product “…will eliminate all your key problems.” Wow! That is a pretty tall order. On a more realistic note, it is designed to keep keys from rattling, better organize them, and make them easier to carry.

We started this review cycle with open minds, but a healthy dose of skepticism. After all, we have carried keys on traditional key rings for a couple of decades, and people have carried keys for hundreds of years before us. Could there really be something new and innovative in the management of keys? The is the second key organizer that we received for review. The Key-Bar arrived a week or two before the Grip-Key and is discussed in a separate review here: http://gear-report.com/key-bar-key-organizer-review/

01-IMG_20150330_150055Some assembly required

The Grip-Key arrived wrapped in bubble wrap and inside a padded USPS First Class mail envelope. The Grip-Key had 2 sets of 3 screws (long and short) and T-nuts, a spring steel belt clip like you find on many IWB holsters, and a little instruction sheet. Assembly was simple enough. Just slide a screw through each end of the Grip-Key, plus one in the center and start putting on keys. Well, actually, it sounds a bit easier than it turned out to be in practice. While the whole process of setting up a Grip-Key is not complicated, it took me a bit of trial and error to get the right distribution of keys on each end. I had already drilled out the holes in a couple of keys, as the Key-Bar screws were just barely too large to fit. Since I was moving keys from the Key-Bar to the Grip-Key, this make the Grip-Key, the holes had already been enlarged sufficiently for the Grip-Key screws. I assembled and reassembled the Grip-Key about 3 times before I found the distribution of keys that worked best for me. It helped that I had already been through this process with the Key-Bar. Then a week later I realized that I had my big car key in the wrong place, as there is actually a molded indention on one end just for a large car key. However, there is a significant design difference between the two. The Grip Key sides are Kydex which has been molded a bit. The shape of the Kydex dictates positioning of keys and provides some squeezing pressure in a few places.

Any issues with the Grip-Key?

Grip-Key key organizer - done

No major issues, but some interesting challenges.

  • If you have any odd shaped keys, the you may not be able to use them in the Grip-Key. See the pic below where you see the round key to my little fire safe sticking out the side. I made it work, but it is not contained like the flat keys. Keys with built in car remotes likely won’t fit at all.
  • If you have a key fob for the door locks and alarm on your car, then you will have to attach it to the outside of the Grip-Key. Not a big deal, as there is a little grommet reinforcing a hole for this. Just something you have to keep in mind.
  • 09-IMG_20150514_173315Some keys don’t have holes big enough for the screws that hold the keys in the Grip-Key. I drilled out the holes to make them big enough.
  • It took some trial and error to figure out how to best arrange the keys on the Grip-Key. As with most of these “issues”, they aren’t really “issues”, just stuff you have to learn and adjust to.
  • The Grip-Key torques a bit when I turn the ignition key in the Battle Wagon. It doesn’t cause any problem, just feels weird to me.

What is Grip-Key made of?
The sample provided for this review is made of Kydex with a woodland ACU digital camo pattern printed on it. A quick scan of grip-key.com shows various other Kydex color and print options. Dimensions are about 4 inches x 1.5 inches.

Grip-Key key organizer - Key-Bar compared

Grip-Key key organizer – Key-Bar compared

Does the Grip-Key work?

First, let’s talk about how we tested the Grip-Key. Conceptually, the Grip-Key is only the second such device that I had seen. I kept noticing both Key-Bars and Grip-Keys in Instagram Pocket Dump pictures after creating our Gear Report Instagram account. I pinged Key-Bar on Instagram and they were kind enough to offer one for review. Within a week I noticed a similar product with a rather different implementation in the Grip-Key and they offered to send one also. So, we were brand new to the idea of using a key organizer and had both a Key-Bar and Grip-Key for review. While both products are similar in usage, their design and materials are quite different. So, I (Jeff) took the Key-Bar and Josejuan took the Grip Key. After about a month we switched. Each of us spent a month carrying each of the key organizers.

Based on this somewhat extended test, we came to a clear answer of “Yes!” It actually took a few days for me to get used to the different feel of having a Key-Bar clipped to the upper inside of my left hand, front pants pocket. Since I carried the Key-Bar first, I had no such adjustment period when I switched to the Grip-Key. I can say without a doubt that NOT being poked in the groin by keys pointing random directions in my pocket was a welcome change. While I may have started the review period with a healthy

Grip-Key key organizer - ignition

Grip-Key key organizer – ignition

skepticism, I am surprised to say that I don’t care to even think about going back to a keyring. The only problem I have at the moment is that I can’t decide which one I want to keep carrying. The Grip-Key and Key-Bar have some notable differences and each has pros and cons. Josejuan has the Key-Bar now and I am considering asking if he would mind trading it back to me. The Key-Bar is a bit heavier, but the rigid metal sides feel better to me when turning a key… like starting a the Luxury Battle Wagon, since there is no torsional flex. I never had any issues with the screws coming loose in the Key-Bar, but I have a couple of times with the Grip-Key. The Kydex Grip-Key is lighter, and thinner, which I like, but the pocket clip is a lot larger and tends to scrape on things. The Key-Bar’s pocket clip never seemed to snag on anything. Overall, I think I prefer the Key-Bar but not by much. I think either is a great way to get your keys under control.

Is it bulky or odd to have in my pocket?
Well, I think it was a bit odd at first, but not after I got used to it. Yes, the Grip-Key adds 2 slabs of Kydex to the already bulky set of keys in my pocket. However, the Grip-Key organizes the keys in 2 neat stacks so that it actually feels more compact than carrying the same keys on key rings. Because the pocket clip holds the keys close to vertically in my pocket, I don’t really notice them there nearly as much as before the Grip-Key. Josejuan had similar thoughts on this issue.

Grip-Key key organizer - belt clip

Grip-Key key organizer – belt clip

Does Gear-Report.com recommend the Grip-Key?
Yes, this is one of the items that has been an eye opener to both of our reviewers. While I really expected to be unimpressed and left scratching my head as to why anyone would pay $25 for Grip-Key, instead I find myself wondering how it took this long for someone to bring such a product to market. While I like the solid feel of the Key-Bar vs the flexible Kydex of the Grip-Key, I certainly like the Grip-Key’s $25 price better than the $45 for the entry-level Key-Bar.

Is the Grip-Key a good value?
The MSRP of this camo model is $25.
This seems high for a key chain, but it is not just price that we are discussing . We include here the value, performance and benefit from use.
What say our reviewers:

Jeff: “The $25 price seems to be on the low end for this new class of products. Given that this is a 100% American made, hand-crafted product, $25 seems like a fair price.”

Josejuan: “I like the Grip-Key a lot.”

Do we recommend?
Highly. As a product that we would not necessarily be seen as needed, most adults have at least a few keys for the office, auto, and home. Having a nice compact set of keys has proved to us the usefulness of this product.
The sample provided to us is the basic unit. The company has a variety of custom options and the Shark Key accessory to go with their Grip-Key.

Gear Rating:

Gear Score
Gearswww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.com
A good option for quieting and organizing your keys

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Key-Bar Key Organizer Review

What is a Key-Bar? No, its not the key to the liquor cabinet. We think it is worth your time to keep reading anyway. Key-Bar is a key organizer that allows you […]
key-bar key organizer - some keys don't fit

key-bar key organizer – some keys don’t fit

What is a Key-Bar?

No, its not the key to the liquor cabinet. We think it is worth your time to keep reading anyway.
Key-Bar is a key organizer that allows you to stabilize, align, and organize your personal array of keys, giving you a compact Swiss-Army knife style sandwich with your keys neatly stored inside.

A product in search of a need?

The sales pitch is that the Key-Bar keeps keys from rattling, better organizes them, and makes them easier to carry. We started this review cycle with open minds, but a healthy dose of skepticism. After all, we have carried keys on traditional key rings for a couple of decades, and people have carried keys for hundreds of years before us. Could there really be a better way? The is the first key organizer that we received for review. The Grip Key arrived a week or two later and will be discussed in a separate review.

key-bar key organizer - assembly

key-bar key organizer – assembly

Some assembly required

The Key-Bar arrived in a metal box similar to an Altoids tin, complete with 3 pairs of stainless screws, a pocket clip, a key fob loop, a stack of stainless washers / key spacers, directions and a couple of rubber o-rings. Assembly was simple enough. Just thread an o-ring onto a screw, slide a screw through each end of the Key-Bar, and start putting on keys. Well, actually, it sounds a bit easier than it turned out to be in practice. While the whole process of setting up a Key-Bar is not complicated at all, it took me a bit of trial and error to get the right combination of keys, screws and washers. I also had to drill out the holes in a couple of keys, as the screws were just barely too large to fit. I assembled and reassembled the Key-Bar no less than 5 times before I found the distribution of keys that worked best for me. Josejuan estimated that 20 keys would fit in the Key-Bar. I have a few odd shaped/sized keys, so I think about 15-ish is about all it will hold for me.

Any issues with the Key-Bar?

key-bar key organizer - drilling key holes

drilling key holes

No major issues, but some interesting challenges.

  • If you have any odd shaped keys, the you may not be able to use them in the key-bar. See the pic below where you see the round key to my little fire safe sticking out the side. I made it work, but it is not contained like the flat keys. Keys with built in car remotes likely won’t fit at all.
  • If you have a key fob for the door locks and alarm on your car, then you will have to attach it to the outside of the key-bar. Not a big deal. Just something you have to keep in mind.
  • Some keys don’t have holes big enough for the screws that hold the keys in the Key-Bar. As you can see, I drilled out the holes to make them big enough.
  • It took some trial and error to figure out how to best arrange the keys on the Key-Bar. As with most of these “issues”, they aren’t really “issues”, just stuff you have to learn and adjust to.
  • The round ends of the Key-Bar may prevent your car key from going all the way in to the ignition. I could have ground down the end of the Key-Bar, but opted instead to file a bit of plastic off of the ignition switch housing in the Luxury Battle Wagon. For the record, I have no idea why Ford thought it necessary to put such a big key vagina on e-150.
key-bar key organizer - doesn't fit

doesn’t fit

key-bar key organizer - filing the Ford e-150 so it would fit

filing the Ford e-150 ignition housing so the Key-Bar would fit

What is Key-Bar made of?
The sample provided for this review is made of aluminum and stainless steel screws. A quick scan of key-bar.us shows various other materials such as copper, titanium, carbon fiber, brass, and a few multi-material hybrids. They also offer a few interesting finish options, which appear to be mostly different types of anodizing.

Grip-Key key organizer - Key-Bar compared

Grip-Key key organizer – Key-Bar compared

Does the Key-Bar work?

First, let’s talk about how we tested the Key-Bar. Conceptually, the Key-Bar is the first such device that I had seen. I kept noticing it in Instagram Pocket Dump pictures after creating our Gear Report Instagram account. I pinged Key-Bar on Instagram and they were kind enough to offer one for review. Within a week I noticed a similar product with a rather different implementation in the Grip-Key and they offered to send one also. So, we were brand new to the idea of using a key organizer and had both a  Key-Bar and Grip-Key for review. While both products are similar in usage, their design and materials are quite different. So, Jeff took the Key-Bar and Josejuan took the Grip Key. After about a month we switched. Each of us spent a month carrying each of the key organizers.

Based on this somewhat extended test, we came to a clear answer of “Yes!” It actually took a few days for me to get used to the different feel of having a Key-Bar clipped to the upper inside of my left hand, front pants pocket. The pocket clip holds the Key-Bar up and secure, instead of having a jumbled mess of keys at the bottom of my pocket. I can say without a doubt that NOT being poked in the groin by keys pointing random directions in my pocket was a welcome change. While I may have started the review period with a healthy skepticism, I am surprised to say that I don’t care to even think about going back to a keyring. The only problem I have at the moment is that I can’t decide which one I want to keep carrying. The Grip-Key and Key-Bar have some notable differences and each has pros and cons. Josejuan has the Key-Bar now and am thinking of asking if he would mind trading it back to me. The Key-Bar is a bit heavier, but the rigid metal sides feel better to me when turning a key… like starting a the Battle Wagon, since there is no torsional flex. I never had any issues with the screws coming loose in the Key-Bar, but I have a couple of times with the Grip-Key. The Kydex Grip-Key is lighter, which I like, but the pocket clip is a lot larger and tends to scrape on things. The Key-Bar’s pocket clip never seemed to snag on anything. Overall, I think I prefer the Key-Bar but not by much. I think either is a great way to get your keys under control.

Is it bulky or odd to have in my pocket?
Well, I think it was a bit odd at first, but not after I got used to it. Honestly, yes, the Key-Bar adds 2 chunks of metal to the already bulky set of keys in my pocket. However, the Key-Bar organizes the keys in 2 need stacks so that it actually feels more compact than carrying the same keys on key rings. Because the pocket clip holds the keys close to vertically in my pocket, I don’t really notice them there nearly as much as before the Key-Bar. Josejuan was more direct in his feedback, stating “No, it is not. Compared to the usual having the keys freely moving and jingling in your pocket, this is cleverly organized and quieter. The key-bar has a clip included which lets you clip the keys to the belt or pocket edges.”

Does Gear-Report.com recommend the key-bar?
Yes, this is one of the items that has been an eye opener to both of our reviewers. While I really expected to be unimpressed and left scratching my head as to why anyone would pay $45 for Key-Bar, instead I find myself wondering how it took this long for someone to bring such a product to market.

Is the Key-Bar a good value?
The MSRP of this aluminum model is $45.
This seems high for a key chain, but it is not just price that we are discussing . We include here the value, performance and benefit from use.
What say our reviewers:

Jeff: “Call me cheap, but I struggle a bit with the $45 price tag. At the same time, I am looking forward to getting the Key-Bar back.”

Josejuan: “On this we have to acknowledge that it is worth every penny.”

Do we recommend?
Highly. As a product that we would not necessarily be seen as needed, most adults have at least a few keys for the office, auto, and home. Having a nice compact set of keys has proved to us the usefulness of this product.
The sample provided to us is the basic unit. The company has more advanced options and also has some accessories to go with their key-bar. They have small tools like screw driver, bottle opener, stainless comb, memory stick, and other items that compliment their system.

Gear Rating:

Gear Score
Gearswww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.com
A surprise product that I didn't expect to really like, but won me over with solid construction and reliable use

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Bear Creek Arsenal Review – Gear Report Road Trip Factory Tour

It started with an email to Jason, the resident FFL and AR specialist at Gear Report. A couple of Silencer manufacturers committed to send cans for review. Each was rated […]
Bear Creek Arsenal visit - black logo

Bear Creek Arsenal visit – black logo

It started with an email to Jason, the resident FFL and AR specialist at Gear Report.
A couple of Silencer manufacturers committed to send cans for review. Each was rated for up to .300 AAC Blackout… but Gear Report didn’t have any guns chambered in .300 blackout.
I asked Jason who he recommended for quality, but budget friendly AR15 rifle and pistol uppers in .300 AAC. Since Jason builds a LOT of ARs for Law Enforcement Agencies in the region, he often has the challenge of finding the best value in ARs that can be depended on in deadly situations. He gave me only 3 names, and one was followed by… “oh, and they are just down the road in Sanford, NC”.

That was Bear Creek Arsenal.

Bear Creek Arsenal visit - no cameras

Bear Creek Arsenal visit – no cameras allowed

Who?

I checked out their website and found that they really do offer pretty good prices. However, I had never heard of them and wanted to see for myself what kind of commitment to quality they have. My undergraduate degree is in Industrial Technology and I created an ISO-9000 quality program for a manufacturer back in the day… So, I have enough formal training to recognize a well run shop with a focus on quality… or the lack of quality focus. Bear Creek Arsenal was kind enough to agree to let the Gear Report team crash their facility on a Friday afternoon. So, Jeff, Josejuan and Chris from Three Pillars Shooting piled in the luxury battlewagon and blew off “work” for a Road Trip! While our brief visit did not afford us a thorough review of their production and quality control systems, the gun room, where barrels were being inspected, bore snaked, oiled, and sleeved in protective wrap for storage until final assembly, appeared clean and well organized… both good signs.

I had heard that Bear Creek is a “small shop”. Um… what?! The main shop floor by the office isn’t massive, but it is just one of several expansive buildings filled with a mix of large CNC machines of various sorts and bins upon bins of raw materials and machined parts for cars and guns. And yes, I said car parts. Bear Creek Arsenal is owned by Moore’s Machine Company and resides on their site in Sanford, NC. While Bear Creek Arsenal may be a family owned business, it is certainly not a little Mom and Pop shop. The elephant in the room, as I found out while doing research for this post, might just be the rough start that MMC got off to when they started making AR-15 pattern rifles. While I have no experience with any MMC branded rifles, the internet has a long memory and some reviews of their early products are rather brutal. This might be the reason that such an effort was made to impress upon us their intense focus on improving their product quality. The reality is that all I can really report on is what I see and experience, and so far I have seen nothing to worry me. In fact, left the facility rather impressed. The proof, they say, is in the pudding… or in this case, the barrels, as we have a few barrels that were pulled from their production stock and sent with us for testing and reviews. I am told that a complete upper will ship soon with a black spiral fluted 24″ heavy barrel with .223 Wylde chamber. Unfortunately, we had to leave before it was ready. Can’t wait to see how the Bear Creek Arsenal products perform.

Bear Creek Arsenal visit - upper

Bear Creek Arsenal visit – upper

Pics or it didn’t happen!

I apologize that we were not able to take any pictures or video in their production facility, but also appreciate that they described a big, ongoing investment in improving the quality of their products. It makes sense that BCA would want to protect their processes and products from the prying eyes of the brands they have in their sights. We were allowed to take a few pictures on the workbench in the gun room of select parts and assemblies. It is a real shame that we can’t share with you any info on the prototypes in various stages of production that we were shown. Some were awesome… one of the uppers that is in pre-production quite literally made the hair stand up on my arms. It was stunning. And then there was that one… doh! Almost slipped up and spilled the beans.

Barrels as works of art?

What do you do when you are a manufacturer who makes your own barrels, but can’t decide which new models would be best received by consumers?

Bear Creek Arsenal visit - Which barrel do you like best

Bear Creek Arsenal visit – Which barrel do you like best

Easy, let Gear Report line up a bunch of options and take pictures, then wait for the Gear Heads to let you know what they like. In this set you see 8 different barrels, from top to bottom. Please leave a comment stating which you like best.

  1. 16″ parkerized contour barrel
  2. 16″ stainless contour barrel
  3. 16″ diamond fluted parkerized heavy barrel
  4. 16″ diamond fluted stainless heavy barrel
  5. 18″ Bear Claw spiral fluted Melonite stainless barrel
  6. 10.5″ Heavy 1:8 .300 AAC Blackout Parkerized barrel
  7. 18″ (I think) stainless spiral fluted
  8. 16″ M4 1:9 coyote tan Cerakote

Sadly, the coolest barrel I have ever seen was sitting just 10 feet away and we were not able to take a picture of it. Lets just say that you will want to check the BCA website and FaceBook pages periodically to see if they release it. You will know it when you see it. :) Seriously… the only thing that troubles me about this mystery barrel is that the typical lightweight AR handguard would still cover up quite a bit of the barrel.

Bear Creek Arsenal visit - 80% lower

Bear Creek Arsenal visit – unfinished 80% lower

NC born ARs

While they do source some raw parts, like upper and lower forgings, from elsewhere, most big parts are machined in-house. Bear Creek Arsenal drills, reams, rifles, turns, and if applicable, flutes barrels on their CNC Machines. They said that the quality of their barrels is beyond what even they expected and is leading the charge to higher quality. While our best interrogation techniques were not sufficient to pry out of them the brand names, I hear that BCA supplies OEM barrels to a variety of big name brands. Another, non-Bear Creek source told us a couple of brand names and, indeed, they were well known brands. Bear Creek Arsenal makes their own A2 bird cage muzzle devices, gas blocks and A2 front sights, as well as machining to complete  the forged uppers and lowers. They have other parts in the works that will be made in house soon. If you have followed the Bear Creek Arsenal brand, you might have noticed that the branding has changed. Gone is the bear with a swiping paw, replaced with a circle with an angry bear head. I was told that the transition to the new branding is in the works and being done in conjunction with improved quality measures.

More to come…

This was our first trip to Bear Creek Arsenal and, as with any new relationship that we care about, we are taking things slow. We saw a few prototypes that aren’t yet ready to fire, and heard about a few other cool things in development. We expect to visit BCA again when these new products, with a few innovations that I pinky swore not to reveal yet, are ready. With any luck, we will be cleared to take some pictures and maybe even video from the shop floor (not allowed on the shop floor this time) and will have more time to explore more products in more detail. In the mean time, look for the reviews on the barrels we received for testing as soon as we track down some uppers to build them on.

 

 

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Win A Free Anderson Manufacturing AR15 / AR10 Trigger Kit

This contest has ENDED. Please congratulate Mark T., the lucky winner. Follow the directions in the entry form below to enter the contest to win a free Anderson Manufacturing AM […]

This contest has ENDED. Please congratulate Mark T., the lucky winner.

AR15 Trigger Give-a-Way Gear-Report.com

AR15 Trigger Give-a-Way Gear-Report.com

Follow the directions in the entry form below to enter the contest to win a free Anderson Manufacturing AM Hammer and Trigger Kit

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Lone Wolf Distributors LWD-17TH Threaded Glock Barrel Review

Quick questions (and answers) for the impatient : How does the Lone Wolf Distributors LWD-17TH threaded barrel fit in the Glock 17? It slid into place and performed well. Is the […]
Lone Wolf Distributors Glock barrel upgrade LWD barrel installed + thread protector installed 1

Lone Wolf Distributors Glock barrel upgrade LWD barrel installed + thread protector installed 1

Quick questions (and answers) for the impatient :

Quotable: “Get a Lone Wolf threaded barrel for your Glock. You will be glad you did.” – Don Berckman (GParmsLLC.com)

Lone Wolf Distributors Glock barrel upgrade both barrels removed + thread protector

Lone Wolf Distributors Glock barrel upgrade both barrels removed + thread protector

1)Installation

Installation of the Lone Wolf Distributors LWD-17TH threaded barrel for the Glock 17 was the quickest, easiest upgrade I have ever made to a firearm.

Simply:

  • Remove the magazine and manually verify that the chamber is empty/unloaded
  • While still unloaded and with the muzzle pointed in a safe direction, pull the trigger to release the firing pin
  • Pull the slide back about 1/8″ and hold while pulling down on the slide release
  • Move the slide forward off of the lower frame
  • Carefully remove the spring assembly
  • Remove the barrel
  • Insert the LWD-17TH barrel
  • Reinstall the spring assembly
  • Reinstall the slide on the lower frame
  • Cycle the slide to verify that it is installed properly

It literally took longer to type these instructions that it does to complete the installation process.

The installation is shown at the beginning of the review video above. Pay attention or you will miss it!

The table in the video is the HySkore Ten Ring Portable Shooting Bench, which we REALLY like.

Lone Wolf Distributors Glock barrel upgrade LWD barrel installed + Yankee Hill Machine silencer

Lone Wolf Distributors Glock barrel upgrade LWD barrel installed + Yankee Hill Machine silencer

Why?

Some reasons one might need a new pistol barrel:

  • A barrel with threads around the muzzle end is required to mount most silencers
  • To shoot a broader range of ammo (Glock’s polygonal barrel rifling is not compatible with cheaper lead bullets)
  • For greater accuracy via a higher quality and/or slightly longer barrel
  • To replace a worn or damaged barrel
  • For a different barrel finish (stainless vs other coatings)

The first is the reason we requested a barrel from Lone Wolf distributors, as we are working on a series of articles on how an average person legally acquires a silencer, how silencers work, shooting with silencers, etc. We also need a threaded barrel for the Ruger SR1911, but opted to start with a threaded Glock 17 barrel since it is an easy drop-in upgrade with no gunsmithing required. Many 1911 replacement barrels require custom fitting by a gunsmith.

Lone Wolf Distributors Glock barrel upgrade out of package

Lone Wolf Distributors Glock barrel upgrade out of package

Features

The Lone Wolf Distributors LWD-17TH threaded barrel for the Glock 17 is advertised as follows:

Lone Wolf Distributors replacement barrels are manufactured from the highest grade mill select 416 stainless forgings. CNC machined and heat treated, providing a life time of service and unparalleled accuracy at an affordable price. The standard groove and land rifling make this an excellent choice for those who wish to shoot lead, plated or jacketed bullets. Can be used in factory ported or stock pistols. Intended for use in the Glock 17 pistol only. Threaded 1/2 x 28 to fit Gemtech suppressors (or similar).

Special features include:

  • Ready to use, pre-fit drop in. No gunsmithing required.
  • Precision machined from heat treated 416R stainless forgings.
  • Oversized lock-up area produces greater shot-to-shot accuracy.
  • Tighter dimensions than the original.
  • Polished feed ramp and bore, diamond turned exterior
  • Maximum chamber support, improved feed ramp design.
  • Broach cut rifling and target crown.
  • Ok to use lead, plated or jacketed bullets.
  • Lifetime warranty.
  • Does not fit “pencil style” Gen1 slides.
Lone Wolf Distributors Glock barrel upgrade LWD barrel target crown

Lone Wolf Distributors Glock barrel upgrade LWD barrel target crown

Lone Wolf Distributors will replace any of our barrels or barrel accessories which are found to have manufacturing or material defects. Customer modifications or the use of reloaded ammunition will void this warranty.”

I don’t have the data to support or challenge the claim that the barrel is made to tighter dimensions than the original.

For my purposes, the two LWD barrels that I have shot both worked without a hitch for a combined 100-ish rounds. Obviously, I’ll need to report back after our silencers arrive and I have had a chance to put more and a greater variety of rounds down the pipe.

Overall

Gear Score
Gearswww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.com
The barrel looks good and functions properly so far. Giving a conservative 4.0 gear rating only because of the limited use so far. I expect to upgrade this rating if it continues to perform well when a silencer is attached and more types of ammo are tested.

Lone Wolf Distributors Glock upgradeLone Wolf Distributors

If you own a Glock pistol and have ever looked for upgrade parts, then you have likely run across Lone Wolf Distributors already. They have a reputation for parts that work at a fair price. Based on our limited use of a couple of their barrels, the reputation looks earned. However, we will update if any issues arise. Barrels are a staple of LWD, but they carry a broad line of Glock upgrade products as well as a variety of parts and accessories, including a Glock magazine compatible AR15. If you have an LWD parts that you would like to see reviewed, let us know in the comments below.

GearReport logo Round AR15Where’d you get that ammo, bro?

We are fortunate to have an arrangement with Ammunition Supply Company where they provide ammunition for all of our reviews. In return, we share our videos and reviews with ASC for them to use on their website. For this review we shot Winchester 9mm FMJ 115 Grain “white box”, Remington UMC 9mm FMJ 115 Grain and Speer LE Gold Dot 9mm JHP 115 Grain.

Huge thanks to Ammunition Supply Company, who kicked in nearly 100 rounds of 115 grain ammo for this test.

 

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Mossberg 715 T Tactical .22lr AR-15 copy rifle review

Unlike our typical review, I was sufficiently disappointed by the Mossberg 715 T “Tactical” .22lr rifle that I didn’t even shoot it. In short, the plastic faux-AR15 shell wrapped around […]

Unlike our typical review, I was sufficiently disappointed by the Mossberg 715 T “Tactical” .22lr rifle that I didn’t even shoot it.
In short, the plastic faux-AR15 shell wrapped around a plinkster 702 action and barrel screams “cheap airsoft crap” loud enough that I couldn’t bring myself to give it to my son as his first rifle. However, just minutes before selling it I made the video below to explain why I am so let down by this crappy AR-15 copy.

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2

Best AR-15 Trigger: AR Upgrade Fire Control Group Options Test Review and Ranking

What is the best AR-15 trigger? Which AR trigger is best for Hunting? What qualities should I look for in an AR15 trigger? What is the best AR-15 trigger for […]

GearReport logo Round AR15What is the best AR-15 trigger?
Which AR trigger is best for Hunting?
What qualities should I look for in an AR15 trigger?
What is the best AR-15 trigger for the money?
Should I upgrade the trigger in my duty rifle?

Yep, we hear those questions a lot. Heck, we have ASKED those questions more than once, over the years. This review explores AR trigger DIY upgrade options, addresses the questions above, and reveals a few surprises.

While the tried and true “mil-spec” trigger group common to M-16 and AR-15 rifles has served well over the years, it is far from optimized for, well, much of anything. The Gear Report team set out to narrow the field of AR platform Fire Control Group upgrades through bench and field testing to help you sort out what to look for in an AR-15/AR-10 trigger, and evaluate a range of options in various price ranges. (FCG = the actual trigger and the associated parts that translate the shooter’s finger motion into the strike of the firing pin)

Countless hours later our 5 man range test team put over 2,000 rounds down a combined 6 AR uppers paired with 9 different AR lowers. Eight brand new lowers were equipped with freshly installed AR trigger upgrades. The ninth was an existing lower with a mil-spec trigger that was added to the test group as the control to remind us what a stock AR trigger felt like.

The contenders

AR15 AR10 trigger upgrade review trigger prices chart vertical

The price range is pretty broad in this test, which will make things more interesting as we progress. :)

The Tests

AR10 AR15 trigger upgrade test hammer drop block

Bob installing a Hiperfire trigger in an AR pistol lower, while Josejuan test fires an AR rifle lower that he just installed a trigger in

Bench testing

1) Assembly
We received the JP Enterprises and WMD Guns triggers already installed in lowers. S0, we can’t comment specifically on them, although it should be a safe assumption that the WMD Guns NiB-X trigger installation would be about the same as the Palmetto State Armory trigger, which is also a mil-spec trigger design. All 5 Hiperfire Hipertouch triggers and the Timney Trigger were DIY installs prior to testing.

Click Here for Josejuan’s video on how to install the Timney AR Competition trigger.
Click Here for my detailed video on installing the 24C, which is the same method as all Hiperfire Hipertouch 24 triggers.
Click Here for directions on how to install the Hiperfire Hipertouch EDT trigger.

A huge thanks goes to Anderson Manufacturing for supplying 6 complete AR-15 lower receivers that we used for the 5 Hiperfire triggers and the Timney trigger. Look for a review soon on the Anderson Manufacturing AR15 Lower receivers (model AM-15). In short, they all worked perfectly during testing. Jason, or resident FFL and AR builder, commented that he had avoided Anderson because many associate their low cost with low quality. However, based on what he saw during our rigorous testing, he would likely start using Anderson Manufacturing lowers on future builds.

2) Hammer drop block

After all triggers were installed in their own brand new lowers we put the hammer drop block in each lower receiver magazine well to test the triggers for proper operation and assess the trigger’s feel. This allowed each tester to rapidly switch the hammer drop block to different lowers and test the trigger feel for accurate comparison.

JP Enterprises Armageddon Gear Revolution Trigger pull scale3) Trigger pull scale

To provide an objective measure of the force required to fully pull each trigger and release the hammer we used a G.P.S. Aluminum Firearm Trigger Scale and the following procedure:

  1. clamp the magazine well block in the vise,
  2. slide the upper onto the magazine well block. So, the upper is completely stable and not subject to movement during trigger testing,
  3. cock the hammer by hand,
  4. reset the peak weight ring on the trigger pull scale,
  5. place the trigger pull scale test arm on the trigger in the location that you will place your finger when shooting,
  6. pull gently aft on the trigger pull scale until the trigger releases,
  7. record the peak weight from the trigger pull scale
  8. lather, rinse, repeat 2 more times
  9. average the 3 pull weights

Results… For the data junkies:

data

And for the more visually oriented:

AR15 Trigger pull weights chart

Timney Triggers 667-S AR-15/AR-10 Trigger Upgrade

Timney Triggers 667-S AR-15/AR-10 Competition Trigger

There were a couple of surprises from the trigger pull test.

  • First and most surprising is that the Timney Triggers Competition AR Trigger averaged over 4Lb, when this model is supposed to be pre-set for a 3 Lb pull.
  • The WMD Guns NiB-X fire control group came in at under 5 Lb with stock mil-spec springs. We were pleasantly surprised, as we expected closer to 7 Lb.

Why does trigger pull weight matter?

Generally, we tend to think of a light trigger as being more conducive to accuracy because very little effort is required to pull the trigger. Conversely, a heavy trigger requires more muscle exertion from the trigger hand, which can cause the gun to be shifted off of the aim point during the trigger squeeze.

However, pull weight is not the whole story. Other factors influencing trigger feel and fitness for any specific use include:

  • length of trigger pull
  • how slowly or abruptly the full weight of the trigger pull is felt
  • how smooth or rough the triggers motion is
  • how much or how little creep or pre-travel there is before the trigger breaks
  • how firm or infirm the break of the trigger is
  • how far the trigger moves past the break point (over-travel)
  • how far the trigger must move forward after a shot to reset
  • how quickly the mechanical parts of the trigger move when actuated, both on the shot and in resetting for the next shot

While we won’t dissect every one of the above trigger characteristics in detail, we can generalize our desired attributes for the following activities:

Hunting mid/long pre-travel, mid/heavy pull, drop safe
Personal Defense mid/long pre-travel, mid/heavy pull, drop safe
Duty / Service Rifle mid/long pre-travel, mid/heavy pull, drop safe
3 Gun competition little/no pre-travel, light/very light pull, quick reset, crisp break
Long range long pre-travel, light pull, surprise break
All around drop safe, mid pre-travel, mid pull, quick reset

Much of these attributes are personal preferences, although any activity that involves walking with a firearm should have a trigger that will not fire when dropped.

4) Creep & Overtravel and Reset

Manufacturer Model Creep Overtravel Reset
JP Enterprises Armageddon Gear Roller Trigger ~0″ ~1/16″ ~1/16″
Timney Triggers Competition AR Trigger 667-S ~0″ ~1/16″ ~1/16″
WMD Guns NiB-X Fire Control Group ~1/16″ ~1/16″ ~1/8″
Hiperfire Hipertouch 24 ~1/8″ ~1/8″ ~1/8″
Hiperfire Hipertouch 24E (Enhanced) <=1/16″ ~1/16″ ~<=1/8″
Hiperfire Hipertouch 24 3G (3 Gun) ~0″ ~1/16″ ~1/16″
Hiperfire Hipertouch 24 C (Competiti0n) ~0″ ~1/16″ ~1/16″
Hiperfire Hipertouch EDT ~1/8″ ~1/16″ ~3/16″
Palmetto State Armory “mil-spec” from PSA LPK ~1/16″ ~1/16″ ~1/8″

These measurements were not as exact as I would have liked, due to the inability to track down a TriggerScan unit… hence the ~ to indicate “about”, as in “about 1/16th of an inch).

Range testing

All 5 of our Test Team members shot each of the 9 triggers in each of the following scenarios:

  1. AR15 AR10 trigger upgrade review long range shooting

    Shooting the long range portion of the test under the watchful eye of RSO Bob

    100 yards – slow fire for accuracy

  2. Short range tactical carbine – quick acquire target, shoot, reload, acquire target, shoot drills at 5-15 yards
  3. 40 yard plate rack – two person duel to see who could knock down the most plates
  4. 40 yard steel silhouettes – informal two person duel to see who could put the most shots on their silhouette most rapidly
AR15 AR10 trigger upgrade review Range test equipment

It takes a lot of gear for a range test this big

 

How each trigger performed in each range test has been discussed at length in each trigger’s written review. I encourage you to read the ones that interest you and CLICK HERE to watch our review video series as well. 

After the 4 primary range tests we took an informal vote to determine the top 3 triggers in the test and pitted them against each other in a 10 round mag dump test with a shot timer recording split times. The same shooter shot all 3 triggers as fast as possible. And as the Editor I took the honors on this test.

AR15 AR10 trigger upgrade review mag dump split times

Armageddon Gear Revolution Trigger module AR15 trigger review

Armageddon Gear Revolution AR15 trigger

Again, another very interesting data set, with statistically identical averages for the 2 top triggers, the JP Enterprises Armageddon Gear Roller trigger and the Timney Triggers AR Competition trigger model 667-S. Averaging split times over 10 shots, each with a very different standard deviation. I bet I could shoot 10 round splits all day with those two triggers an not get another set of average split times that were identical. It appears that the Timney trigger had the edge with the lower  standard deviation… meaning a more consistent split time. However, I hesitate to read too  much into this data, as I suspect that the real limiting factor here is my finger. I don’t think I could pull the triggers fast enough to see if one really is faster than the others.

The Results

All of the above is interesting, but what did the testers think?

After shooting with each trigger on each stage of the test a ranking was recorded for the trigger by each of the Gear Report Test Team.

Yep. Thats a LOT of data.

Test Team  Picks
Here is what it looked like when we averaged the rankings across all testers (stacked columns on top, raw numbers on bottom):

AR15 AR10 trigger upgrade review trigger average rankings all stacked

Too many numbers for you? Here is the same data presented as a vertical column graph:

 

AR15 AR10 trigger upgrade review trigger average rankings all

From the prior 2 charts it is clear that the Test Team Liked the hard-core competition triggers. How about we cut to the chase?

When I averaged the votes of all 5 testers across each category, then averaged the category averages to come up with an overall average rank… ONE number to represent how each trigger fared against the competition. Here is how the triggers ranked:

AR15 AR10 trigger upgrade review trigger average rankings all 1-9

hiperfire hipertouch 24c ar-15 trigger review

hiperfire hipertouch 24c ar-15 trigger

It was no surprise that the JP Enterprises Armageddon Gear Roller trigger and the Hiperfire Hipertouch 24C Competition trigger were favorites in the test. They were the most expensive triggers in the test and, arguably, the most highly tuned for a specific task. It is surprising that it was a statistical dead heat between the two, both scoring an identical 4.708333333 average score. We also expected the Timney Triggers AR Competition trigger model 667-S to be in the hunt, and it sure was.

Also not surprising is the PSA LPK mil-spec trigger bringing up the rear with a rather embarrassing 2.27 out of 5 average. Even more embarrassing is that this turd was my primary AR trigger for the year prior to this test. I knew it was a bad trigger. The terrible feel of the trigger is what inspired this review series, actually.

In the surprising results category we have the WMD Guns NiB-X Fire Control Group. This trigger started life as a sock mil-spec trigger, but the NiB-X coating, polishing and spring tuning performed by WMD proved that you can, in fact, polish a turd. The NiB-X trigger scored about 4.o on a 5 point scale, vs 2.27 for the unmolested mil-spec trigger in the group. This is a HUGE improvement and make clear why the Test Team universally voted the WMD Guns NiB-X trigger the best value of the bunch.

Personally, I was surprised that the Hiperfire Hipertouch 24E Elite trigger was voted #7 in our rankings. To me, the Hiperfire Hipertouch 24E Elite trigger is the “jack of all trades” of the group. It may not have been the best at any of the shooting tests in our evaluation, but it was very good at all of them. Contrast this to the highly specialized competition triggers that took the top 4 spots in the rankings. I also liked the Hiperfire Hipertouch EDT trigger and think it would make an excellent choice for a hunting rifle, a duty or service rifle, or personal defense rifle. However, I might prefer the 24E in each of those roles. Maybe configured with a slightly heavier trigger pull to get it in the 3.5 – 4 Lb range.

The other surprise of the test was the Hiperfire Hipertouch 24. After emailing Terry at Hiperfire and explaining what we felt from the trigger, Terry basically said… “yes, that is how it is supposed to feel”. As the only trigger in the test that felt like a 2 stage trigger, I suspect that the Test Team may have reacted too strongly and ranked the 24 lower than it deserved. After all, it is designed to have a long, very light, smooth pull with a surprise break. Every other trigger in the test was designed for a crisp, predictable break.

“Rank the triggers in order from what you would most like to own, to least like to own”

Sounds similar to the voting we did before, but this time it had a twist. Instead of ranking each trigger immediately after shooting it in each stage of the test, I asked each tester to rank order what they would most like to own after they had a week or two to think about it. This was a big picture question that would naturally be skewed by each tester’s personal arsenal, shooting habits, and preferences. With a list of 9 items from each person I assigned 10 points to the top pick, 9 points to the next item on the list, and continued to deduct one point for each step down the list, so that the least desired item on the list would be worth 2 points. Here is how it shook out:

Trigger Total Points
24c 42
JP lower 40
Timney 35
24 3g 35
WMD lower 33
24e 29
EDT 21
24 16
JP Trigger 10
mil spec 8

WMD NiB-X coated fire control group upgradeNotice that only one person chose to rank the JP trigger by itself. Everyone else said they wanted it as it was delivered from JP, in the JP-15 lower. Same for the WMD trigger… everyone wanted it installed in the WMD Beast NiB-X lower, as delivered. While these skewed the votes a bit, we see much of the same results from the individual tests, with the EDT falling in the list, as the WMD Lower surged up a few spots.

The Testing Team

Tester Background
Josejuan Structural designer, outdoorsman
Jason AR builder, FFL
Chris NRA instructor, RSO,US Army vet, Three Pillars Traing LLC President
Bob NRA instructor, NC CCH Instructor, RSO
Brian Mechanical Engineer, hunting guru (consulting, not at range test)
Jeff Gear Report editor, USAF Vet

Huge thanks to Ammunition Supply Company, who kicked in 2,000 rounds of bulk 55 grain ammo for this test.

Images from the test:

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Timney Triggers Competition AR Trigger 667-S AR15 AR10 trigger review

Quick Q&A for the impatient: How does the Timney Competition AR Trigger compare to other AR triggers? (The Timney is at the hard-core competition trigger end of the spectrum) Is the […]
Timney Triggers 667-S AR-15/AR-10 Trigger

Timney Triggers supports the NRA to protect our rights. We like that!

Quick Q&A for the impatient:

  • How does the Timney Competition AR Trigger compare to other AR triggers? (The Timney is at the hard-core competition trigger end of the spectrum)
  • Is the Timney 667-S AR Trigger a good value at an MSRP of $229? (The price of the Timney is in line with other high-end options in the competition trigger market. Value depends on how well the drop-in, set pull weight trigger meets your needs.)
  • Should I buy a Timney Small Pin Competition AR Trigger? (The Timney is a great trigger at a fair price. Buy it if you want a fast action shooting trigger that is pre-assembled and has a set pull weight)
  • Is the Timney Trigger good for hunting? (We would consider hunting with the Timney if we were in a fixed position, like a deer stand)
  • Is the Timney drop-in AR Trigger a good upgrade for my duty rifle? (We prefer a trigger with a bit of creep and heavier pull weight for a duty application)
  • Where are your videos? Click here for the Gear-Report.com YouTube Channel

Timney Triggers 667-S AR-15/AR-10 Trigger UpgradeQuotable: “I like this trigger better for drills than on the bench.” -Jason

Special thanks to Bob for contributing to this review.

Bench testing

1) Assembly

We received the Timney Competition AR Trigger directly from Timney Triggers as a review sample. Josejuan installed the Timney Trigger in an otherwise complete AR-15 lower receiver provided by Anderson Manufacturing (Model AM-15). You can watch the installation video and read about the installation here:

Timney Triggers 667-S AR-15/AR-10 Trigger install

Tightening the Timney drop-in trigger set screws with the supplied allen wrench

http://gear-report.com/how-to-install-timney-triggers-ar-15ar-10-trigger-upgrade-video-2/

In short, the drop-in module is a pretty simple installation that even a novice should be able to complete. However, it can be tricky holding the spring legs away from the screw holes to install the set screws. It helps a LOT to mount the lower receiver on a magazine well vise block to hold it completely still during the installation and free up both hands. *If you will if install in a polymer lower, then you should be aware there is also a warning in the instructions to use a small aluminum plate in the mag well. You need to request the aluminum plate when you order the trigger. We installed in an aluminum Anderson AM-15 receiver, so this was not an issue for us.

2) Hammer drop block

We started with the hammer drop block in the Timney Competition AR Trigger lower receiver to test the Timney trigger for proper operation and to get our heads around the trigger’s feel. This was an important step for us, as it allowed each of our 4 testers to rapidly switch the hammer drop block to different lowers and test the trigger feel for accurate comparison. We expected the  Timney Competition AR Trigger to feel like a 3 Gun competition trigger with a very light pull. The break was crisp on the hammer drop block, with a very short pull and reset.

3) Trigger pull scale

G.P.S. Trigger pull ScaleMeasuring trigger pull weight is pretty simple:

  1. clamp the magazine well block in the vise,
  2. slide the upper onto the magazine well block. So, the upper is completely stable and not subject to movement during trigger testing,
  3. cock the hammer by hand,
  4. reset the peak weight ring on the trigger pull scale,
  5. place the trigger pull scale test arm on the trigger in the location that you will place your finger when shooting,
  6. pull gently aft on the trigger pull scale until the trigger releases,
  7. record the peak weight from the trigger pull scale
  8. lather, rinse, repeat 2 more times
  9. average the 3 pull weights

The Timney Competition AR single stage trigger delivered trigger pulls of 4.25 Lb, 3.5 Lb, and 4.25 Lb for an average of 4.08 Lb.

Wait, what?

I thought the Model 667-S was pre-set at 3 LB?!

Maybe it will get lighter with continued use. We have to admit that it was such a short, smooth pull that it was hard to tell the weight by finger alone.  In fact, some of our testers commented on how light the trigger felt. However, this was in the ballpark for the more expensive triggers in the test; heavier than some but much lighter than a mil-spec trigger.  Some shooters noted that it would not be a good fit for a duty rifle, where too light a trigger can be a disadvantage/safety issue.

The Timney trigger was very smooth and crisp, with a short and distinct reset.   It inspired confidence.

4) Creep & Overtravel

I measured total travel the tip of the trigger at about 1/16 of an inch. There is nearly undetectable creep, and slightly less than 1/16″ of overtravel and reset. This makes the Timney Competition AR Trigger just about the shortest trigger pull and reset of all triggers we tested. This is great for the intended purpose as a fast action shooting competition trigger.

The Results

AR trigger upgrade Timney Triggers AR Competition trigger 100 yards

Group 1 shooting while our RSOs ensured range safety

100 yards

All 5 shooters slung five rounds of American Eagle 55 grain .223 Remington at small numbered paper targets from benches with shooting rests or sandbags at 100 yards to get a feel for how the Timney Competition AR Trigger performed under slow, controlled fire. The feedback was nearly unanimous that the Timney trigger performed in league with the best triggers in the test, with our most experienced Timney loyalist complaining that it didn’t live up to the standards of Timeny’s bolt gun triggers for slow, precision shooting.

 Short range tactical carbine

Chris from Three Pillars Shooting, LLC and Bob, our other NRA instructor collaborated to run the team through basic 3-10 yard quick target acquisition, rapid shot strings and short mag shoot-reload-shoot drills. In this scenario the Timney Competition AR Trigger performed very well, with a great balance between trigger pull weight and a solid trigger feel. Some of the competition triggers felt a bit light in this shooting scenario.  The Timney’s four pound pull weight felt well-balanced between speed and security.

AR15 trigger upgrade test Plate Rack duel40 yard plate rack

A 2 shooter duel to see who could hit the most of the 6 plates of 8 inch diameter in a horizontal row at 40 yards. The Timney trigger put in a respectable showing in the plate rack duels, but didn’t feel as fast as the best of the light, short-reset competition triggers. While much better than the mil-spec triggers, the Timney 667-S AR Trigger was reported to feel not quite as fast as the very best in the group. We will have more on trigger speed in our full Big Trigger Upgrade Test review coming soon. The results surprised some of the testers.

40 yard steel silhouettes

This was less formal with 2 shooters competing to see who could put a string of shots on their steel silhouettes most rapidly from 40  yards. We found that the competition triggers excelled with their ultralight trigger pulls and short resets. As with the 40 yard plate rack duels, the Timney Competition AR Trigger felt smooth and solid, inspiring confidence, but also felt just a bit slower than the best triggers in the test.

Timney competition ar15 trigger transparent receiver

The elusive “ghost gun” receiver.
Or maybe just an image of how the Timney trigger is installed

Overall

The Timney trigger was fun to shoot.  Most of the testers really liked it and no one disliked it.  Jason, a big Timney fan, initially felt it was not up to the standard of Timney triggers in his bolt-action rifles. However, after the Action Shooting portions of the test, he reported that he favored it as well. He still reported liking the JP roller trigger and Hiperfire 24C trigger better than this Timney trigger. Somewhat of a mixed bag. In my opinion, this is a rather nice competition trigger that was simply overshadowed in this test by two triggers that have innovative finger contact surfaces. I am actually leaning towards keeping the Timney Trigger in one of my personal lowers. I am looking forward to shooting this trigger more as it kind of grew on me during the final stages of testing… the plate rack and silhouette duels.

Gear Score
Gearswww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.com
Excellent upgrade option for 3Gun and action shooting competitors that want an easy drop-in, set pull weight trigger

timney_logoTimney Triggers

One of the first things you notice on the Timney Triggers website (timneytriggers.com) is that they are “Proudly made in the USA since 1946.” We certainly appreciate keeping the level of expertise developed over six decades of precision trigger work right here in the US of A. Timney has a significantly broader trigger catalog than any other manufacturer in our AR Trigger Upgrade Test, boasting 170 different trigger models for a variety of types of firearms and archery.

The Big AR Trigger Upgrade Test

We tested 9 AR platform trigger upgrades from 5 different manufacturers to identify:

  • Which AR trigger upgrade is the best value?
  • Which AR-15 and AR-10 triggers are best suited for hunting, competitive shooting, personal defense, duty rifle?
  • Which AR trigger do we like best?

Starting with a just barely broken-in “mil-spec” trigger group as our “control”, our team of 5 testers assembled and dry fired each AR FCG on the hammer drop block to get a feel for each trigger, measured trigger pull weight with a trigger pull gauge, then shot each trigger in long range, tactical carbine, and competitive shooting situations to assess each fire control group in a real-world setting. We shot nearly 2,000 rounds down a combined 6 AR uppers so we could provide the most comprehensive trigger upgrade review possible.

Huge thanks to Ammunition Supply Company, who kicked in 2,000 rounds of bulk 55 grain ammo for this test.

You can read more about the hiperfire AR15 AR10 trigger upgrade and the other triggers in the test in our full AR trigger upgrade review.

 

 

 

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JP Enterprises Armageddon Gear Revolution Trigger Upgrade Review

Quick questions (and answers) for those in a rush : How does the JP Enterprises Armageddon Gear Revolution Trigger Upgrade compare to other AR triggers? (A unique, innovative roller trigger unlike […]
Armageddon Gear Revolution Trigger module AR15 trigger review

Armageddon Gear Revolution AR15 trigger

Quick questions (and answers) for those in a rush :

Quotable: “Trigger reset is incredibly short and positive” – Bob

Bench testing

1) Assembly

JP sent the JP Enterprises Armageddon Gear Revolution Trigger Upgrade for review. Unlike most of the other Fire Control Groups that we reviewed in our Big AR Trigger Upgrade test series, we did not install the JP trigger in an otherwise complete AR15 lower receiver (Model AM-15) provided by Anderson Manufacturing. JP Enterprises chose to send the Armageddon Gear Revolution trigger already installed via anti-walk pins in a complete JP forged AR-15 Lower assembly (model JP-15). To make things even more interesting JP included their Silent Captured Spring (CSC) buffer spring as well as an ambi safety selector, magpul trigger guard, JP branded Hogue overmolded grip and the Exos Defense Ti-7 stock.

AR10 AR15 trigger upgrade test hammer drop block

Josejuan testing a trigger with the hammer drop block while Bob installs a trigger in a pistol lower

2) Hammer drop block

Before our range testing day, we put the hammer drop block in the JP lower receiver to test the JP Enterprises Revolution Trigger  for proper operation and get an undistracted feel for the trigger. This was an important step for us, as it allowed each tester to rapidly switch the hammer drop block to different lowers with different triggers to test the trigger feel for accurate comparison. Similar to the other action shooting competition triggers, I expected an ultra-short travel, light trigger with a short reset. The JP Armageddon Gear Revolution Trigger is advertised as having virtually zero creep and a very short reset, since it was designed for the competitive action shooting arena where speed, accuracy and split times reign supreme. Hammer block testing confirmed that there is virtually zero creep. As in, when the trigger resets, which is audible, it is already pretty much at the wall.

The most striking aspect of the Armageddon Gear REVOLUTION trigger is the unique cylindrical trigger bow. It is basically a hollow polymer cylinder on a straight trigger rod which allows the polymer cylinder to rotate… or revolve… about the trigger rod. Try as I might, I can cycle the trigger over and over and over and never seem to be able to keep the trigger from rotating. This suggests that I have a bit too much lateral muscle memory that would likely have translated into a slight deflection of the rifle as the trigger is pulled. Anything that moves the rifle off of the aim point during shooting degrades accuracy. The theory here is that the JP Armageddon Gear Revolution Trigger‘s roller trigger helps the shooters finger quickly find the neutral position for a straight back pull instead of pulling off to one side. In practice, I certainly feel the rolling motion as the trigger makes it difficult to pull to one side or the other.

JP Enterprises Armageddon Gear Revolution Trigger pull scale3) Trigger pull scale
Measuring trigger pull weight is pretty simple:

  1. clamp the magazine well block in the vise,
  2. slide the upper onto the magazine well block. So, the upper is completely stable and not subject to movement during trigger testing,
  3. cock the hammer by hand,
  4. reset the peak weight ring on the trigger pull scale,
  5. place the trigger pull scale test arm on the trigger in the location that you will place your finger when shooting,
  6. pull gently aft on the trigger pull scale until the trigger releases,
  7. record the peak weight from the trigger pull scale
  8. lather, rinse, repeat 2 more times
  9. average the 3 pull weightsJP Enterprises Armageddon Gear Revolution Trigger close up

The JP Enterprises Revolution Trigger at a consistent 3.25 Lb on each of 3 pulls with our trigger pull scale. JP chose the yellow hammer spring and yellow trigger spring configuration, which they advertise as the competitions/recreation setup, providing between 3.0 and 3.5 Lb trigger pull weight in most lowers. Other optional spring configurations range from 3 Lb to 4.5 Lb pull weight.

The consensus among our testers is that the sub-3 Lb range is too light and and the lack of pre-travel in the trigger might be a safety concern for the uncontrolled hunting environment. The Armageddon Gear Revolution Trigger is designed as hard-core, dedicated action shooting competition trigger and we think the pull weights available are well suited for that type of shooting.

4) Pre-travel & Over-travel

We measured total travel the tip of the trigger at about 1/16 of an inch. With no perceptible pre-travel, or creep, that leaves about 1/16 of an inch of over-travel, with a positive, audible reset of about 1/16 of an inch. Your finger won’t have far to move to run this trigger fast.

 The Results

AR trigger upgrade WMD Guns NiB-X trigger 100 yards bench100 yards

All 5 shooters shot five rounds of American Eagle 55 grain .223 Remington at small, numbered paper targets from benches with shooting rests or sandbags at 100 yards to get a feel for how the Armageddon Gear Revolution Trigger performed under slow, controlled fire. Since the JP roller trigger is designed for action shooting competition, I expected it, as I had with the other competition triggers, to feel too light and touchy for longer range shooting. What I found was that the light trigger pull and lack of pre-travel meant that I had to focus more on when to release the hammer… because that is basically what you get with the action shooting competition triggers… precise control over when the hammer releases. Distance shooting is usually characterized more by a desire to be surprised when the trigger breaks so that the shooter doesn’t involuntarily react to the trigger break with any sort of twitch or flinch that might move the gun and make the shot miss it’s mark. While I think the action shooting competitions triggers are fine for casual longer distance shooting, they are likely not what most people would choose for serious distance shooting. Specifically, I liked the feel of the JP roller trigger when distance shooting and put an extra 10 rounds or so down range with it to try to discern whether the roller was making an impact on my accuracy, or just distracting me, as it feels markedly different than any other trigger I have ever shot with. It is going to take many more trips to the range to sort this out for certain, but I a committed to getting to the bottom of this and will put in as many trips to the range as are necessary to offer a positive opinion on this. 😉

ar trigger upgrade review close range carbine shooting
 Short range tactical carbine

Chris from Three Pillars Shooting, LLC and Bob, our other NRA instructor collaborated to run the team through basic 3-10 yard quick target acquisition, rapid shot strings and short mag shoot-reload-shoot drills. We mentioned in the reviews of the non-competition triggers that the competition triggers felt a bit light during this stage of the test. We actually had one premature shot at the short range firing line because the shooter meant to just find the trigger with his finger, but instead put just enough pressure to allow it to fire  (sorry, don’t recall which of the competition triggers it was. We didn’t write it down, as the shooter quickly said it was his fault, not the trigger). No one was hurt, and it wasn’t the triggers fault… it was just operating as designed. However it highlights the reason why most people prefer a bit heavier trigger with a bit of creep for a tactical environment. That said, the Armageddon Gear Revolution Trigger performed well in this portion of the test with no complaints from any tester. Josejuan noted that for this type of shooting he would not use the pad of his trigger finger on the trigger, but instead would roll his finger forward so that the trigger rested in the first joint of the finger. With my big hands and longer than normal fingers I had a tendency to wrap my finger too far around the trigger like I was grabbing it with a meat hook, which likely induced a bit of deflection. I suspect that adding a spacer to the rear of the pistol grip, or changing to a modular grip that allows for different thickness backstraps to be used would take care of this issue. While this issue has more to do with fitting the AR to my abnormally large hands, I only found it to be an issue on the JP roller trigger, given that the angle my finger naturally sits on the trigger induces a bit of roll on the trigger. Clear as mud? I will discuss this in the full JP Armageddon Gear Revolution Trigger review video.

JP Enterprises Armageddon Gear Revolution Trigger Speed Hammer40 yard plate rack

A 2 shooter duel to see who could hit the most of the 6 plates of 8 inch diameter in a horizontal row at 40 yards. Similar to the tactical carbine shooting, the JP Armageddon Gear Revolution was in it’s element during the plate rack duels. The short, quick reset really seemed to help with getting off a string of aimed shots quickly.  The JP Speed Hammer is likely a big part of this, as it reduces the swinging mass of the hammer for improved lock time. If you believe that little details make a difference in performance, then the speed hammer is an interesting study. The JP Speed Hammer is made from A2 tool steel, hardened to 58 Rockwell all the way through, then press fit with a stainless pin boss. I really felt that the limiting factor in my speed on the plate rack was how fast I could move my finger.

I shot the JP roller trigger equipped lower as #6 out of 9 and just after the Hiperfire 24C. Both are VERY fast triggers that offer a unique finger placement option (Hypershoe vs roller). Whether you would prefer the wider finger contact surface that the hypershoe provides or the cylindrical roller surface of the Armageddon Gear trigger is difficult to sort out in a review. Our test team was not unified in our opinions of which feels “better” or offers the most advantage to the shooter. However, we were in agreement that both of the triggers are exceptional and offer a unique feel.

 JP Enterprises Silent Captured Spring AR buffer40 yard steel silhouettes

This was less formal with 2 shooters competing to see who could put a string of shots on their steel silhouettes most rapidly. It is no surprise that the light trigger pull and ultra-short reset made the JP roller trigger very fast. The JP Armageddon Gear Revolution trigger was so smooth that getting back on target quickly was a bit easier than any other setup. This is likely due to the added bonus that JP Enterprises paired with the roller trigger, the JP Silent Captured Spring buffer. With a totally different operating mechanism than a standard AR buffer tube, buffer and spring assembly, the SCS is supposed to make the buffer operation smoother and quieter. As far as I could tell, it did.

Overall

The Armageddon Gear Revolution Trigger is hard-core competiti0n shooting trigger. Period. It is not intended to be a jack-of-all-trades, instead excelling at one thing: fast fire control that does not negatively impact accuracy.

Gear Score
Gearswww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.com
Our whole team rated this trigger as one of the top in our test.

JP Enterprises jprifles.com logoJP Enterprises

According to John Paul Gangl, the founder and head of JP Enterprises, many in the competitive shooting community thought he was off his rocker when he set out to create a company selling really expensive AR platform components and full rifles. JP, as he is widely known, answered my questions and told me about his company, product lines and vision as background for this review and our larger Big AR Trigger Upgrade Test. As the interview progressed I began to understand both why folks may not have bought into his vision right away, and how he has converted many of the doubters with a commitment to quality and innovation that few dare to pursue.
The AR platform was not initially designed as a precision competition rifle. JP professed to be a bolt gun snob back when he owned a gun store and gradually warmed to the platform only after identifying a few ways to coax better accuracy and speed out of an AR. Jump ahead through 40 years of competing at the top levels in a variety shooting formats (many with the AR) and it isn’t hard to see that JP is a good shooter. Translating that into cutting edge competition rifles with a variety of innovative components of his design and selling for multiples of what many shooters consider an “expensive” rifle… well, that would take more than shooting skill. I can see why some doubted the sanity of his vision.

JP is not an engineer, but he described a rather engineer-like methodical iterative approach to evolving and improving his products. The process went something like: evaluate the platform, identify the biggest impediment to getting the performance he wanted, imagine a way to improve that function, translate that idea to functional parts or assemblies… and start the process over. Over time, he has made both incremental and major component improvements, but done so with the big picture in mind so that the end product meets the needs of the folks that are willing to spend to get the best. Lots of brands shoot to be the best and talk about a commitment to quality and innovation. JP is a rather convincing spokesman, but the products that his team produces speak louder and seem to have validated his vision.

As I write this I am reminded of how Jason, our resident AR builder and the most experienced with the AR platform among the Gear Report team reacted when I said that JPRifles.com was sending a lower for our test. The reverence in his voice, how he gently picked up the JP lower to inspect it when it arrived, the look in his eye whenever he talked about JP products … especially the look when he said that he didn’t expect to ever own a JP rifle, as they are out of his price range… Between that and talking to JP himself it is hard to not automatically revere anything produced by JP. I try to see past Jason’s very manly man-crush on JP at the product itself. Is the JP Armageddon Gear Roller Trigger in this review really better than the Hiperfire Hipertouch 24C Competition trigger that Terry Bender and his team produce? I don’t know. Frankly, I give both triggers top marks and think that a competitor could hardly go wrong with either of the innovative triggers with out-of-the-box trigger bow solutions. Pairing the JP trigger with their Silent Captured Spring bugger system and JP-15 lower with a premium stock surely showed that JP is serious in his holistic approach to the AR, that improving one part (the trigger, in this case) is good, but not good enough. What I am confident of, however, is that both JP and Terry will continue to drive towards perfection, one incremental innovation at a time.
JP said that he wants to send his adjustable gas block and handguard solutions for testing next, and I look forward to gaining and sharing a better understanding of the JP Enterprises product line.

GearReport logo Round AR15The Big AR Trigger Upgrade Test

We tested 9 AR platform trigger upgrades from 5 different manufacturers to identify:

  • Which AR trigger upgrade is the best value?
  • Which AR-15 and AR-10 triggers are best suited for hunting, competitive shooting, personal defense, duty rifle?
  • Which AR trigger do we like best?

Starting with a just barely broken-in “mil-spec” trigger group as our “control”, our team of 5 testers assembled and dry fired each AR FCG on the hammer drop block to get a feel for each trigger, measured trigger pull weight with a trigger pull gauge, then shot each trigger in long range, tactical carbine, and competitive shooting situations to assess each fire control group in a real-world setting. We shot nearly 2,000 rounds down a combined 6 AR uppers so we could provide the most comprehensive trigger upgrade review possible.

Huge thanks to Ammunition Supply Company, who kicked in 2,000 rounds of bulk 55 grain ammo for this test.

You can read more about the AR15 AR10 trigger upgrade and the other triggers in the test in our full AR trigger upgrade review.

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Hiperfire Hipertouch 24 AR10 AR15 trigger review

Quick questions (and answers for the impatient): How does the Hiperfire 24 trigger compare to other AR triggers? (It is a nice trigger with a very different feel than any other […]

hiperfire hipertouch 24 ar-15 trigger installlQuick questions (and answers for the impatient):

  • How does the Hiperfire 24 trigger compare to other AR triggers? (It is a nice trigger with a very different feel than any other single stage trigger we tested. In fact, it feels more like a 2 stage trigger.)
  • Is the Hiperfire 24 replacement trigger a good value at an MSRP of $185? (Among the more refined AR trigger upgrade options, the 24 is one of the lowest cost options. If you like the feel the 24 is designed for, then it is a good value.)
  • Should I buy a Hiperfire 24 trigger? (Each of Hiperfire’s triggers is aimed at a certain set of trigger feel parameters. If you desire a light trigger that is smooth and has a deceptively long pull, followed by a surprise break (no hard wall), then the 24 might be for you.)
  • Is the Hiperfire Hipertouch 24 trigger  good for hunting? (The long-ish trigger pull and almost 2-stage feel is well suited for hunting.)
  • Is the Hiperfire 24 trigger  a good upgrade for my duty rifle? (Yes, the Hiperfire 24 is a good upgrade option.)

Quotable: “Never hits a wall, but it’s so smooth I could get used to it.   Not my favorite but not too objectionable either.  If I was going to buy a Hiperfire, I’d definitely spend a few more bucks for one of the crisper ones.” – Bob

hiperfire AR15 AR10 trigger upgradeBench testing

1) Assembly

We received the Hiperfire 24 trigger to review from Hiperfire and installed it in an otherwise complete AR15 lower receiver provided by Anderson Manufacturing (Model AM-15).

Installation is not overly simple, but is not that hard either thanks to the incredibly well written instructions included in the package and the easy to follow installation videos online at the Hiperfire website. I have yet to find any other trigger with such clear illustrations and step by step instructions as are included with all of the Hiperfire triggers.

Click Here for my detailed video on installing the 24C, which is the same method as all Hiperfire Hipertouch 24 triggers.

Hiperfire Hipertouch 24 AR-15 AR-10 trigger upgrade preview review Overall, I found the 24 3G easier to install than a stock mil-spec type trigger, mainly because the 24 series triggers are easier to align within the mag well when inserting the trigger and hammer pins. The 24 3G has more parts. However, the parts are easier to install in the 24 series triggers and the safety selector can remain in place during installation (a big plus). Since I think installation of a mil-spec trigger is manageable for a detail oriented hobbyist, and the 24 series triggers are easier to install than a mil-spec trigger, any trigger from the Hiperfire Hipertouch 24 series is a great option for a DIY upgrade. Just take your time and be sure everything is assembled properly, the hammer spring is oriented the right direction, the shelf on the toggle pins faces outward, etc.

Chosen configuration: The Hiperfire 24 3G trigger comes with 3 toggle spring options. The toggle springs are an ingenious design that simultaneously alter trigger pull weight and hammer strike energy. Toggle spring option are:

  • Blue = medium trigger pull weight and low-end stock hammer energy
  • Yellow = medium-light trigger pull weight and low-end stock hammer energy
  • Grey/plain = light trigger pull weight and 35% higher hammer energy than stock

Because the Hiperfire Hipertouch 24 trigger was being installed in a pistol lower, we wanted to go with the heaviest trigger pull option available. So, we chose the lightest toggle springs, the blue painted springs, which provides the heaviest trigger pull and… this part is a bit backwards from how most trigger groups work… the lightest hammer strike. While we do not have a reliable way to measure hammer energy, this claim by Hiperfire makes perfect sense, as the toggle springs are compressed as the trigger is pulled, countering some of the trigger pull spring energy for a lighter trigger pull. When the trigger breaks the toggle springs uncompress, working with the hammer spring to push the hammer forward. So, lighter toggle springs = heavier trigger pull and less hammer energy. Most people are after the opposite and would want to use the Yellow or Grey springs.

If there is a down side to the Hiperfire 24 series design, it is that there are more moving parts within the Hiperfire trigger. However, I can’t see how any parts, aside from possibly the springs, would be likely to wear out or fail under even the heaviest use. While installing the toggle springs takes a steady hand, all of the Gear Report staff that tried it found it easy to master quickly, making in the field trigger spring changes relatively simple and quick.

AR10 AR15 trigger upgrade test hammer drop block

Josejuan testing a trigger with the haner test block while Bob installs a trigger in a pistol lower

2) Hammer drop block

Before joining the #OccupyTheRange movement, we put the hammer drop block in the Anderson Manufacturing lower receiver to test the Hiperfire Hipertouch 24 trigger for proper operation and assess the trigger’s feel. This allowed each tester to rapidly switch the hammer drop block to different lowers and test the trigger feel for accurate comparison. I expected the Hiperfire 24 trigger to feel quite a bit like a mil-spec trigger, but a bit lighter. Why did I expect this? Because the Hiperfire site clearly says that the 24 has the same creep as a mil-spec, stock trigger. However, I found the Hipertouch 24 trigger trigger to be noticeably different than a stock mil-spec trigger in trigger pull weight, perceived length of trigger pull and smoothness.

WMDguns.com NiB-X trigger on G.P.S. Trigger pull Scale
3) Trigger pull scale

Measuring trigger pull weight is pretty simple:

  1. clamp the magazine well block in the vise,
  2. slide the upper onto the magazine well block. So, the upper is completely stable and not subject to movement during trigger testing,
  3. cock the hammer by hand,
  4. reset the peak weight ring on the trigger pull scale,
  5. place the trigger pull scale test arm on the trigger in the location that you will place your finger when shooting,
  6. pull gently aft on the trigger pull scale until the trigger releases,
  7. record the peak weight from the trigger pull scale
  8. lather, rinse, repeat 2 more times
  9. average the 3 pull weights

The Hiperfire Hipertouch 24 trigger delivered trigger pulls of 2.75 Lb, 3.0 Lb, and 3.0 Lb for an average of 2.92 Lb.

Whao! That is a BIG difference in pull weight vs the mil-spec trigger that I was expecting the Hiperfire 24 to feel like. Mil-spec triggers average trigger pull weights are usually closer to the 7 Lb range. This Hipertouch 24 trigger is actually one of the lightest triggers in our Bit AR Trigger Upgrade Test. Each AR trigger upgrade that we test is designed with a specific purpose. The Hiperfire Hipertouch 24 trigger is designed as a high performance service rifle upgrade. Normally I don’t like this light of a trigger for a service rifle, but given the long (feeling) pre-travel, it actually works for me.

4) Creep & Overtravel

We measured total travel the tip of the trigger at nearly 3/16 of an inch. That is split nearly 1/8″ of creep and 1/16″ of overtravel. Yes, that is a lot of pre-travel/creep, at least compared to most of the 8 other triggers in the Big AR Trigger Upgrade test. There is more to trigger feel than distance of pull, and the distance measurements certainly don’t tell the whole story of the Hipertouch 24 trigger. Terry Bender, the Hiperfire CEO described the 24 as follows via email when I inquired about the drastically different feel of the 24 vs the rest of the Hiperfire triggers: “The 24’s creep is same as MIL-spec. Because it’s light and smooth, you can feel it creep “forever.” There is no wall; the pull is flat. It was designed that way for those who want it. I run it on my varmint gun. I’m surprised every time it breaks. It’s very accurate for the patient shooter. One reviewer actually runs the 24 like a 2-stage, or it’s like a 2-stage w/ no 2nd stage. In any case, it will run as fast or as slow as your finger. In other words, it’s controllable, you know where you’re at.” That sounded reasonable to me, but I passed it on to the rest of the Gear Report team for feedback and Bob said “I get what he’s saying, and it matches my experience with it. Never hits a wall, but it’s so smooth I could get used to it….”

 The Results

We tested 9 different AR fire control groups in our Big AR Trigger Upgrade Test. I wanted everyone to be as objective as possible during the range test. So, I suggested that the team NOT do a lot of research on each trigger prior to the test. This backfired a bit for the Hiperfire Hipertouch 24 trigger, as it is designed to have such a different feel than anything else in our test pool, but we weren’t expecting it to feel THAT much different. While we all agreed that it “didn’t feel right”. Post range day research revealed that the Hiperfire 24 trigger upgrade actually felt exactly like it was designed to feel… it just wasn’t what we were expecting.

AR trigger upgrade WMD Guns NiB-X trigger 100 yards

100 yards

All 5 shooters expelled five rounds of American Eagle 55 grain .223 Remington at small, numbered paper targets from benches with shooting rests or sandbags at 100 yards to get a feel for how the Hiperfire Hipertouch 24 trigger performed under slow, controlled fire. The 24 reminded me of a 2 stage trigger with the very light pre-travel that felt long, followed by a surprise break. My range day notes referred to it as a “mushy wall”, but Terry describes it as having no wall. I can see what he means. I think this sort of single stage trigger posing as a 2 stage trigger works well for some people for longer range shooting.

 Short range tactical carbine

Chris from Three Pillars Shooting, LLC and Bob, our other NRA instructor collaborated to run the team through basic 3-10 yard quick target acquisition, rapid shot strings and short mag shoot-reload-shoot drills. The longer creep of the Hiperfire Hipertouch 24 trigger inspired confidence in the close quarters of the “tactical carbine class” style side-by-side firing lineup. The trigger pull weight is on the light side of what we would normally prefer for this type of usage, but coupled with the longer pre-travel it worked well for us. However, some of the competition triggers felt a bit light and touchy in this shooting scenario.

 40 yard plate rack

Enough of the solo shooting at paper, for this part of the test we pitted 2 shooters against each other in a duel to see who could hit the most of the 6 plates of 8 inch diameter in a horizontal row at 40 yards.  The Hipertouch 24 trigger did well, offering no perceived issues to degrade the accuracy or rate of fire. However, it certainly suffered a bit of the same issue that slowed the 24E a bit… to really shoot them fast the shooter needs to get a “feel” for the “sweet spot”, the point in post-shot trigger travel where it is reset and ready to fire again. Knowing where the sweet spot is means that a skilled shooter can limit the forward movement of their finger on follow-up shots and avoid the pre-travel nearly completely. I think that the 24 can be a faster trigger with a bit of practice.

 40 yard steel silhouettes

This was less formal with 2 shooters competing to see who could put a string of shots on their assigned steel silhouettes most rapidly. We found that the competition triggers excelled with their ultralight trigger pulls and ultra-short resets. As with the 40 yard plate rack duels, the Hiperfire Hipertouch 24 trigger performed well, but felt like it was not able to run at it’s full potential because of the limited time we had to learn it’s sweet spot.

Overall

Gear Score
Gearswww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.com
A rather versatile trigger that took some time to grow on me.

hiperfire AR15 AR10 trigger upgrade full lineHiperfire

As noted in our AR Trigger Test Preview, Terry Bender, the Hiperfire CEO wasn’t just willing to pit his triggers against the competition, he was EAGER While every other manufacturer in our big AR Trigger test sent one model of trigger for evaluation, Hiperfire sent all 5 current production triggers. Terry, a graduate degreed mechanical engineer by training, created a very innovative design for the 24 series triggers, adjusting the geometry and mechanisms within the AR trigger group in a quest to get better performance out of the AR fire control group.

GearReport logo Round AR15The Big AR Trigger Upgrade Test

We tested 9 AR platform trigger upgrades from 5 different manufacturers to identify:

  • Which AR trigger upgrade is the best value?
  • Which AR-15 and AR-10 triggers are best suited for hunting, competitive shooting, personal defense, duty rifle?
  • Which AR trigger do we like best?

Starting with a just barely broken-in “mil-spec” trigger group as our “control”, our team of 5 testers assembled and dry fired each AR FCG on the hammer drop block to get a feel for each trigger, measured trigger pull weight with a trigger pull gauge, then shot each trigger in long range, tactical carbine, and competitive shooting situations to assess each fire control group in a real-world setting. We shot nearly 2,000 rounds down a combined 6 AR uppers so we could provide the most comprehensive trigger upgrade review possible.

Huge thanks to Ammunition Supply Company, who kicked in 2,000 rounds of bulk 55 grain ammo for this test.

You can read more about the hiperfire AR15 AR10 trigger upgrade and the other triggers in the test in our full AR trigger upgrade review.

 

0

Hiperfire Hipertouch 24C Competition AR10 AR15 Trigger Upgrade Review

Quick questions (and answers) for the impatient : How does the Hiperfire 24C trigger compare to other AR triggers? (The 24C is a specialized 3 Gun Competition trigger and is most […]
hiperfire hipertouch 24c ar-15 trigger review

hiperfire hipertouch 24c AR-15 & AR-10 trigger upgrade

Quick questions (and answers) for the impatient :

  • How does the Hiperfire 24C trigger compare to other AR triggers? (The 24C is a specialized 3 Gun Competition trigger and is most comparable to the Hiperfire Hipertouch 24 3G. The difference is the 24C has a straight trigger bow with a movable finger “hypershoe”, while the 24 3G has a traditional curved trigger face. Because the 24 3G and 24C are so much alike, you will find the 2 reviews to be rather similar)
  • Is the Hiperfire 24C replacement trigger a good value at an MSRP of $235? (We think all of the Hiperfire triggers are a good value, assuming you match your desired trigger feel with the correct model of Hipertouch trigger.)
  • Should I buy a Hiperfire 24C trigger? (Each of Hiperfire’s triggers is aimed at a certain set of trigger feel parameters. If you desire a fast, light trigger with a unique finger rest (“hypershoe”), obscene adjustability, no creep and a crisp break at the wall, then the 24C might be for you.)
  • Is the Hiperfire Hipertouch 24C trigger  good for hunting? (We think the 24C is more suited to competition than to hunting.)
  • Is the Hiperfire 24C trigger  a good upgrade for my duty rifle? (The 24C is a good trigger. However, we prefer a heavier, and good bit longer trigger pull on a duty rifle.)

Quotable: “All around great trigger. I’ll buy this one from you right now!” – Jason (who now owns the Hiperfire Hipertouch 24C trigger)

Bench testing

Hiperfire hipertouch  24c trigger review Hipershoe

The distinctive Hipershoe has 5 positions along the vertical trigger bow, altering percieved trigger pull weight

1) Assembly

Hiperfire sent the Hiperfire 24C trigger for review. We installed it in brand new and otherwise complete AR15 lower receiver (Model AM-15) provided by Anderson Manufacturing. Installation is not overly simple, but is straight forward thanks to the incredibly well written instructions included in the package and the easy to follow installation videos online at the Hiperfire website. I have yet to find any other trigger with such clear illustrations and step by step instructions as are included with all of the Hiperfire triggers.

Click Here for my detailed video on installing the 24C.

Overall, I found the 24C easier to install than a stock mil-spec type trigger, mainly because the 24 series triggers are easier to align within the mag well when inserting the trigger and hammer pins. The 24C has more parts. However, the parts are easier to install in the 24 series triggers and the safety selector can remain in place during installation (a big plus). Since I think installation of a mil-spec trigger is manageable for a detail oriented hobbyist, and the 24 series triggers are easier to install than a mil-spec trigger, any trigger from the Hiperfire Hipertouch 24 series is a great option for a DIY upgrade. Just take your time and be sure everything is assembled properly, the hammer spring is oriented the right direction, the shelf on the toggle pins faces outward, etc.

Chosen configuration: The Hiperfire 24C trigger comes with 3 toggle spring options. The toggle springs are an ingenious design that simultaneously alter trigger pull weight and hammer strike energy. Toggle spring option are:

  • Blue = medium trigger pull weight and low-end stock hammer energy
  • Yellow = medium-light trigger pull weight and low-end stock hammer energy
  • Grey/plain = light trigger pull weight and 35% higher hammer energy than stock

We chose the heaviest toggle springs, the unpainted grey springs, which provides the lightest trigger pull and… this part is a bit backwards from how most trigger groups work… the heaviest hammer strike. While we do not have a reliable way to measure hammer energy, this claim by Hiperfire makes perfect sense, as the toggle springs are compressed as the trigger is pulled, countering some of the trigger pull spring energy for a lighter trigger pull. When the trigger breaks the toggle springs uncompress, working with the hammer spring to push the hammer forward. So, heavier toggle springs = lighter trigger pull and more hammer energy. The best of both worlds!

Additionally, the Hypershoe has 5 detents in which it can sit on the straight trigger bow, creating a shorter or longer fulcrum which raises or lowers the pull weight and amplifies or reduces the feel of the trigger creep and reset. For testing we positioned the hypershoe in the bottom position, giving the greatest mechanical advantage for a lighter trigger pull feel. If there is a down side to the Hiperfire 24 series design, it is that there are more moving parts within the Hiperfire trigger. However, I can’t see how any parts, aside from possibly the springs, would be likely to wear out or fail under even the heaviest use. While installing the toggle springs takes a steady hand, all of the Gear Report staff that tried it found it easy to master quickly, making in the field trigger spring changes relatively simple and quick.

AR10 AR15 trigger upgrade test hammer drop block

Josejuan testing a trigger with the hammer drop block while Bob installs a trigger in a pistol lower

2) Hammer drop block

Before our range testing day, we put the Hiperfire hammer drop block (they sent us a prototype to test) in the  Anderson Manufacturing lower receiver to test the Hiperfire Hipertouch 24C trigger for proper operation and get an undistracted feel for the trigger. This was an important step for us, as it allowed each tester to rapidly switch the hammer drop block to different lowers with different triggers to test the trigger feel for accurate comparison. As one of two highly refined competition triggers in the Hiperfire lineup, I expected an ultra-short travel, light trigger. The 24C is advertised as having virtually zero creep and a very short reset, since it was designed for the competitive action shooting arena, where speed, accuracy and split times reign supreme. Hammer block testing confirmed that there is virtually zero creep. As in, when the trigger resets, which is audible, it is already pretty much at the wall. While I felt that I needed more time on the 24E to find the sweet spot where the trigger was reset and ready to fire again, there was no such issue with the Hipertouch 24C. When it resets it stops moving and IS at the sweet spot. Additionally, as a guy with pretty big hands, I actually appreciated the slight additional distance that the hypershoe adds to the face of the trigger from the pistol grip. It may be less than 1/4 of an inch, but it was a noticeably more comfortable distance. Another thing that Josejuan pointed out quickly while doing hammer drop block testing is that there is a little molded seam line that bisects the face of the hypershoe vertically. It seems odd that on such a nice trigger that is so well crafted that this little mold seam was left and not at least knocked down a bit. It didn’t cut his trigger finger, but it was enough of an imperfection that he noticed it. Interestingly, when we got to the range with all of the sights, sounds, smells, weather, live ammo and other distractions no one seemed to notice the little unfiled seam.

G.P.S. Trigger pull Scale3) Trigger pull scale
Measuring trigger pull weight is pretty simple:

  1. clamp the magazine well block in the vise,
  2. slide the upper onto the magazine well block. So, the upper is completely stable and not subject to movement during trigger testing,
  3. cock the hammer by hand,
  4. reset the peak weight ring on the trigger pull scale,
  5. place the trigger pull scale test arm on the trigger in the location that you will place your finger when shooting,
  6. pull gently aft on the trigger pull scale until the trigger releases,
  7. record the peak weight from the trigger pull scale
  8. lather, rinse, repeat 2 more times
  9. average the 3 pull weights

The Hiperfire Hipertouch 24C trigger delivered the lowest trigger pull weights of any trigger in our Big AR Trigger Upgrade Test, at  2.25 Lb, 2.5 Lb, and 2.5 Lb for an average of 2.42 Lb.

Just for shits and giggles we moved the Hypershoe from the lowest to the highest position on the trigger bow and trigger pull tests, recording trigger pull weights of 3.5 Lb, 3.25 Lb and 3.25 Lb, for an average of 3.33 Lb. That is nearly a whole pound difference in perceived trigger pull weight adjustment simply by sliding the hypershoe up or down the trigger bow. I don’t want to seem too excitable, but HOLY CRAP! That is impressive and clearly makes the Hypertouch 24C the most user customizable of all the triggers in our test.

The consensus among our testers is that the sub-3 Lb range is too light and and the lack of pre-travel in the trigger might be a safety concern for the uncontrolled hunting environment. The Hiperfire Hipertouch 24C trigger is designed as hard-core, dedicated action shooting competition trigger and we think the pull weights available are well suited for that type of shooting.

4) Pre-travel & Over-travel

We measured total travel the tip of the trigger at just a touch over 1/16 of an inch. With nearly zero pre-travel, or creep, that leaves about 1/16 of an inch of over-travel. Making the reset about 1/16 of an inch.

 The Results

The Hiperfire Hipertouch 24C trigger is designed to be an action shooting competition trigger. I have not yet tried action shooting competition, but based on observations and interviews with competitors, the short, light, already-on-the-wall feel of the 24C seems to be right on the money. While it delivers refined feel for a specific type of shooting, it does so at a $235 price that is competitive for this segment of the market.The Hipertouch 24 C is priced slightly above one of the most established and respected triggers in the market, the Timney Competition AR drop-in trigger (which we are also reviewing) which MSRPs for $228. The Hiperfire 24C trigger itself has the unique Hypershoe on a straight trigger bow vs the Timney Trigger’s curved trigger face, but otherwise feels rather similar. The biggest difference may be that the Timney Trigger is a fixed trigger pull weight drop-in unit, while the Hiperfire offers the user a whopping 15 different trigger pull weights that are pretty simple to change. Or maybe a slightly shorter reset on the Timney.

AR trigger upgrade WMD Guns NiB-X trigger 100 yards bench100 yards

All 5 shooters emptied five rounds of American Eagle 55 grain .223 Remington at small, numbered paper targets from benches with shooting rests or sandbags at 100 yards to get a feel for how the Hiperfire Hipertouch 24C trigger performed under slow, controlled fire. Since the Hipertouch 24C Competition is designed for, well, competition, I expected it to feel too light and touchy for longer range shooting. What I found was that the light trigger pull and lack of pre-travel meant that I had to focus more on when to release the hammer… because that is basically what you get with the Hipertouch 3G and 24C… precise control over when the hammer releases. Distance shooting is usually characterized more by a desire to be surprised when the trigger breaks so that the shooter doesn’t involuntarily react to the trigger break with any sort of twitch or flinch that might move the gun and make the shot miss it’s mark. While I think the 24 3Gun and 24C triggers are fine for casual longer distance shooting, they are likely not what most people would choose for serious distance shooting.

 Short range tactical carbine

Chris from Three Pillars Shooting, LLC and Bob, our other NRA instructor collaborated to run the team through basic 3-10 yard quick target acquisition, rapid shot strings and short mag shoot-reload-shoot drills. We mentioned in the reviews of the non-competition triggers that the competition triggers felt a bit light during this stage of the test. We actually had one or two premature shots at the short range firing line because the shooter meant to just find the trigger with their finger, but instead put just enough pressure to allow it to fire  (sorry, don’t recall which of the competition triggers it was. We didn’t write it down, as the shooter quickly said it was his fault, not the trigger). No one was hurt, and it wasn’t the triggers fault… it was just operating as designed. But it highlights the reason why most people prefer a bit heavier trigger with a bit of creep for a tactical environment. That said, the Hiperfire 24C trigger shot well, even if the trigger might have benefited from shooters that were more accustomed to competition triggers. In fairness, it is a bit of a jump to go from a workmanlike and somewhat gritty mil-spec fire control group to a high performance Ferrari competition trigger.

ar trigger upgrade review close range carbine shooting40 yard plate rack

A 2 shooter duel to see who could hit the most of the 6 plates of 8 inch diameter in a horizontal row at 40 yards. Similar to the tactical carbine shooting, the Hiperfire Hipertouch 24C Competition trigger was in it’s element during the plate rack duels. It was very quick and easy to string together shots in the competition environment compared to the heavier, slower non-competition triggers. If you want to understand the limitations of the mil-spec based triggers, then I recommend shooting something of the caliber of the Hipertouch 3G or 24C. I honestly felt that the limiting factor when shooting plates with the 24C and the other competition triggers was my ability to move my finger faster… or lack thereof.

 40 yard steel silhouettes

This was less formal with 2 shooters competing to see who could put a string of shots on their steel silhouettes most rapidly. In range testing we found that the competition triggers excelled with their ultralight trigger pulls and ultra-short resets. As with the 40 yard plate rack duels, the Hiperfire Hipertouch 24C trigger felt much more deliberate and crisp than some of the lower priced options that we tested (the 24 Elite model was the closest). Even with a very limited number of rounds to “get to know” the trigger, the 24C Competition trigger was pretty easy to figure out: The Hiperfire 24C trigger is built for speed and adjustability. The trigger was reset and ready to go before I could get my sights back on the silhouette target pretty much every time.

Overall

Gear Score
Gearswww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.com
Taking the already good 24 3G trigger and adding 5x the user adjustability via the Hypershoe! How could you NOT love this trigger?

hiperfire AR15 AR10 trigger upgrade full lineHiperfire

As noted in our AR Trigger Test Preview, Terry Bender, the Hiperfire CEO wasn’t just willing to pit his triggers against the competition, he was EAGER. While every other manufacturer in our big AR Trigger test sent one model of trigger for evaluation, Hiperfire sent all 5 current production triggers. Terry, a graduate degreed mechanical engineer by training, created a very innovative design for the 24C series triggers, adjusting the geometry and mechanisms within the AR trigger group. My experience with the complete line of Hiperfire 24 triggers is consistent with how Terry describes them: “The triggers are differentiated best by the amount of creep to meet any preference.” However, I would add that the ability to dial in the trigger pull weight by swapping the springs is a great added feature.

GearReport logo Round AR15

The Big AR Trigger Upgrade Test

We tested 9 AR platform trigger upgrades from 5 different manufacturers to identify:

  • Which AR trigger upgrade is the best value?
  • Which AR-15 and AR-10 triggers are best suited for hunting, competitive shooting, personal defense, duty rifle?
  • Which AR trigger do we like best?

Starting with a just barely broken-in “mil-spec” trigger group as our “control”, our team of 5 testers assembled and dry fired each AR FCG on the hammer drop block to get a feel for each trigger, measured trigger pull weight with a trigger pull gauge, then shot each trigger in long range, tactical carbine, and competitive shooting situations to assess each fire control group in a real-world setting. We shot nearly 2,000 rounds down a combined 6 AR uppers so we could provide the most comprehensive trigger upgrade review possible.

Huge thanks to Ammunition Supply Company, who kicked in 2,000 rounds of bulk 55 grain ammo for this test.

You can read more about the hiperfire AR15 AR10 trigger upgrade and the other triggers in the test in our full AR trigger upgrade review.

 

 

 

0

Hiperfire Hipertouch 24 3G 3Gun Competition AR10 AR15 Trigger Upgrade Review

Quick questions (and answers) for the impatient : How does the Hiperfire 24 3G trigger compare to other AR triggers? (The 24 3G is a specialized 3 Gun Competition trigger and […]

hiperfire AR15 AR10 trigger upgrade

Quick questions (and answers) for the impatient :

  • How does the Hiperfire 24 3G trigger compare to other AR triggers? (The 24 3G is a specialized 3 Gun Competition trigger and is most comparable to the Hiperfire Hipertouch 24C. Because the 24 3G and 24C are so much alike, you will find the 2 reviews to be rather similar)
  • Is the Hiperfire 24 3G replacement trigger a good value at an MSRP of $225? (We think all of the Hiperfire triggers are a good value, assuming you match your desired trigger feel with the correct model of Hipertouch trigger.)
  • Should I buy a Hiperfire 24 3G trigger? (Each of Hiperfire’s triggers is aimed at a certain set of trigger feel parameters. If you desire a fast, light trigger with a curved trigger face, no creep and a crisp break at the wall, then the 24 3G might be for you.)
  • Is the Hiperfire Hipertouch 24 3G trigger good for hunting? (We think the 24 3G is more suited to competition than to hunting.)
  • Is the Hiperfire 24 3G trigger  a good upgrade for my duty rifle? (The 24 3G is a good trigger. However, we prefer a heavier, and good bit longer trigger pull on a duty rifle.)
  • Where is the review video? Click here for the Gear-Report.com YouTube Channel

Quotable: “Great trigger with a very discernable wall and creep so light you really have to look for it.” – Jason

hiperfire hipertouch 24 3g ar-15 trigger review

hiperfire hipertouch 24 3G ar-15 trigger

Bench testing

1) Assembly

We received the Hiperfire 24 3G trigger  for review direct from Hiperfire and installed it in an otherwise complete and brand new AR15 lower receiver (Model AM-15) provided by Anderson Manufacturing. Installation is not overly simple, but is straight forward thanks to the incredibly well written instructions included in the package and the easy to follow installation videos online at the Hiperfire website. I have yet to find any other trigger with such clear illustrations and step by step instructions as are included with all of the Hiperfire triggers.

Click Here for my detailed video on installing the 24C, which is the same method as all Hiperfire Hipertouch 24 triggers.

Overall, I found the 24 3G easier to install than a stock mil-spec type trigger, mainly because the 24 series triggers are easier to align within the mag well when inserting the trigger and hammer pins. The 24 3G has more parts. However, the parts are easier to install in the 24 series triggers and the safety selector can remain in place during installation (a big plus). Since I think installation of a mil-spec trigger is manageable for a detail oriented hobbyist, and the 24 series triggers are easier to install than a mil-spec trigger, any trigger from the Hiperfire Hipertouch 24 series is a great option for a DIY upgrade. Just take your time and be sure everything is assembled properly, the hammer spring is oriented the right direction, the shelf on the toggle pins faces outward, etc.

Chosen configuration: The Hiperfire 24 3G trigger comes with 3 toggle spring options. The toggle springs are an ingenious design that simultaneously alter trigger pull weight and hammer strike energy. Toggle spring option are:

  • Blue = medium trigger pull weight and low-end stock hammer energy
  • Yellow = medium-light trigger pull weight and low-end stock hammer energy
  • Grey/plain = light trigger pull weight and 35% higher hammer energy than stock

We chose the heaviest toggle springs, the unpainted grey springs, which provides the lightest trigger pull and… this part is a bit backwards from how most trigger groups work… the heaviest hammer strike. While we do not have a reliable way to measure hammer energy, this claim by Hiperfire makes perfect sense, as the toggle springs are compressed as the trigger is pulled, countering some of the trigger pull spring energy for a lighter trigger pull. When the trigger breaks the toggle springs uncompress, working with the hammer spring to push the hammer forward. So, heavier toggle springs = lighter trigger pull and more hammer energy. The best of both worlds. If there is a down side to the Hiperfire 24 series design, it is that there are more moving parts within the Hiperfire trigger. However, I can’t see how any parts, aside from the springs, would be likely to wear out or fail under even the heaviest use. While installing the toggle springs takes a steady hand, all of the Gear Report staff that tried it found it easy to master quickly, making in the field trigger spring changes relatively simple and quick.

AR10 AR15 trigger upgrade test hammer drop block

Josejuan testing a trigger with the hammer drop block while Bob installs a trigger in a pistol lower

2) Hammer drop block

Before heading to the range for live fire testing, we put the Hiperfire hammer drop block (they sent us a prototype to test) in the  Anderson Manufacturing lower receiver to test the Hiperfire Hipertouch 24 3G trigger for proper operation and get an undistracted feel for the trigger. This was an important step for us, as it allowed each tester to rapidly switch the hammer drop block to different lowers with different triggers to test the trigger feel for accurate comparison. As one of two highly refined competition triggers in the Hiperfire lineup, I expected an ultra-short travel, light trigger. The 24 3G is advertised as having virtually zero creep and a very short reset, since it was designed for the competitive 3 Gun arena, where speed and split times are king. Hammer block testing confirmed that there is virtually zero creep. As in, when the trigger resets, which is audible, it is already pretty much at the wall. While I felt that I needed more time on the 24E to find the sweet spot where the trigger was reset and ready to fire again, there was no such issue with the Hipertouch 3G. When it resets it stops moving and IS at the sweet spot.

Hiperfire hipertouch trigger pull weight test trigger scale

Testing trigger pull weight with the G.P.S Trigger pull scale and the Hiperfire hammer drop block

3) Trigger pull scale
Measuring trigger pull weight is pretty simple:

  1. clamp the magazine well block in the vise,
  2. slide the upper onto the magazine well block. So, the upper is completely stable and not subject to movement during trigger testing,
  3. cock the hammer by hand,
  4. reset the peak weight ring on the trigger pull scale,
  5. place the trigger pull scale test arm on the trigger in the location that you will place your finger when shooting,
  6. pull gently aft on the trigger pull scale until the trigger releases,
  7. record the peak weight from the trigger pull scale
  8. lather, rinse, repeat 2 more times
  9. average the 3 pull weights

The Hiperfire Hipertouch 24 3G trigger delivered uber-consistent trigger pulls of 2.75 Lb, 2.75 Lb, and 2.75 Lb for an average of… you guessed it, 2.75 Lb.

The consensus among our testers is that the sub-3 Lb range is too light and and the lack of pre-travel in the trigger might be a safety concern for the uncontrolled hunting environment. The Hiperfire Hipertouch 24 3G trigger is designed as hard-core, dedicated 3Gun competition trigger and we think the pull weights available are well suited for that type of shooting.

4) Pre-travel & Over-travel

We measured total travel the tip of the trigger at just a touch over 1/16 of an inch. With nearly zero pre-travel, or creep, that leaves about 1/16 of an inch of over-travel. Making the reset about 1/16 of an inch.

 The Results

The Hiperfire Hipertouch 24 3G trigger is designed to be a 3 Gun competition shooting trigger. I have not yet tried 3 Gun competition shooting, but based on observations and interviews with competitors, the short, light, already-on-the-wall feel of the 24 3G seems to be right on the money. While it delivers refined feel for a specific type of shooting, it does so at a $225 price that is competitive for this segment of the market. In fact, the Hipertouch 3G is priced to go head-to-head with one of the most established and respected triggers in the market, the Timney Competition AR drop-in trigger (which we are also reviewing) at $228. The Hiperfire 24 3G trigger itself has a slightly more forward curved trigger face, resembling a mil-spec trigger face, but otherwise feels rather similar. The biggest difference may be that the Timney Trigger is a fixed trigger pull weight drop-in unit, while the Hiperfire offers the user 3 different trigger pull weights that are pretty simple to change. Or maybe a slightly shorter reset on the Timney.

AR trigger upgrade WMD Guns NiB-X trigger 100 yards bench100 yards

All 5 shooters dispatched five rounds of American Eagle 55 grain .223 Remington at small, numbered paper targets from benches with shooting rests or sandbags at 100 yards to get a feel for how the Hiperfire Hipertouch 24 3G trigger performed under slow, controlled fire. Since the Hipertouch 24 3-Gun Competition is designed for, well, competition, I expected it to feel to light and touchy for longer range shooting. What I found was that the light trigger pull and lack of pre-travel meant that I had to focus more on when to release the hammer… because that is basically what you get with the Hipertouch 3G… precise control over when the hammer releases. Distance shooting is usually characterized more by a desire to be surprised when the trigger breaks so that the shooter doesn’t involuntarily react to the trigger break with any sort of twitch or flinch that might move the gun and make the shot miss it’s mark. While I think the 24 3Gun trigger is fine for casual longer distance shooting, it is likely not what most people would choose for serious distance shooting.

 Short range tactical carbine

Chris from Three Pillars Shooting, LLC and Bob, our other NRA instructor collaborated to run the team through basic 3-10 yard quick target acquisition, rapid shot strings and short mag shoot-reload-shoot drills. We mentioned in the reviews of the non-competition triggers that the competition triggers felt a bit light during this stage of the test. We actually had one or two premature shots at the short range firing line because the shooter meant to just find the trigger with their finger, but instead put just enough pressure to allow it to fire (sorry, don’t recall which of the competition triggers it was. We didn’t write it down, as the shooter quickly said it was his fault, not the trigger). No one was hurt, and it wasn’t the triggers fault… it was just operating as designed. But it highlights the reason why most people prefer a bit heavier trigger with a bit of creep for a tactical environment. That said, the Hiperfire 24 3G trigger shot well, even if the trigger might have benefited from shooters that were more accustomed to competition triggers.

ar trigger upgrade review close range carbine shooting40 yard plate rack

A 2 shooter duel to see who could hit the most of the 6 plates of 8 inch diameter in a horizontal row at 40 yards. Similar to the tactical carbine shooting, the Hiperfire Hipertouch 3Gun trigger  was in it’s element during the plate rack duels. It was very quick and easy to string together shots in the competition environment compared to the heavier, slower non-competition triggers. If you want to understand the limitations of the mil-spec based triggers, then I recommend shooting something of the caliber of the Hipertouch 3G. I honestly felt that the limiting factor when shooting plates with the 24 3G and the other competition triggers was my ability to move my finger faster… or lack thereof.

 40 yard steel silhouettes

This was less formal with 2 shooters competing to see who could put a string of shots on their steel silhouettes most rapidly. In range testing we found that the competition triggers excelled with their ultralight trigger pulls and ultra-short resets. As with the 40 yard plate rack duels, the Hiperfire Hipertouch 24 3G trigger felt much more deliberate and crisp than some of the lower priced options that we tested (the 24 Elite model was the closest). Even with a very limited number of rounds to “get to know” the trigger, the 24 3-Gun Competition trigger was pretty easy to figure out: The Hiperfire 24 3G trigger is built for speed. The trigger was reset and ready to go before I could get my sights back on the silhouette target pretty much every time.

Overall

Gear Score
Gearswww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.com
Not my favorite style of shooting, but a very well designed and crafted specialist trigger. .

hiperfire AR15 AR10 trigger upgrade full lineHiperfire

As noted in our AR Trigger Test Preview, Terry Bender, the Hiperfire CEO wasn’t just willing to pit his triggers against the competition, he was EAGER. While every other manufacturer in our big AR Trigger test sent one model of trigger for evaluation, Hiperfire sent all 5 current production triggers. Terry, a mechanical engineer by training, created a very innovative design for the 24 3G series triggers, adjusting the geometry and mechanisms within the AR trigger group. My experience with the complete line of Hiperfire 24 triggers is consistent with how Terry describes them: “The triggers are differentiated best by the amount of creep to meet any preference.” However, I would add that the ability to dial in the trigger pull weight by swapping the springs is a great added feature.

GearReport logo Round AR15

The Big AR Trigger Upgrade Test

We tested 9 AR platform trigger upgrades from 5 different manufacturers to identify:

  • Which AR trigger upgrade is the best value?
  • Which AR-15 and AR-10 triggers are best suited for hunting, competitive shooting, personal defense, duty rifle?
  • Which AR trigger do we like best?

Starting with a just barely broken-in “mil-spec” trigger group as our “control”, our team of 5 testers assembled and dry fired each AR FCG on the hammer drop block to get a feel for each trigger, measured trigger pull weight with a trigger pull gauge, then shot each trigger in long range, tactical carbine, and competitive shooting situations to assess each fire control group in a real-world setting. We shot nearly 2,000 rounds down a combined 6 AR uppers so we could provide the most comprehensive trigger upgrade review possible.

Huge thanks to Ammunition Supply Company, who kicked in 2,000 rounds of bulk 55 grain ammo for this test.

You can read more about the hiperfire AR15 AR10 trigger upgrade and the other triggers in the test in our full AR trigger upgrade review.

 

 

 

0

Hiperfire Hipertouch 24E Elite AR10 AR15 Trigger Upgrade Review

Quick questions (and answers) for the impatient : How does the Hiperfire 24E trigger compare to other AR triggers? (Nice compromise between pull length and trigger break.) Is the Hiperfire 24E […]

hiperfire AR15 AR10 trigger upgrade

Quick questions (and answers) for the impatient :

  • How does the Hiperfire 24E trigger compare to other AR triggers? (Nice compromise between pull length and trigger break.)
  • Is the Hiperfire 24E replacement trigger a good value at an MSRP of $215? (We think all of the Hiperfire triggers are a good value, assuming you match your desired trigger feel with the correct model of Hipertouch trigger.)
  • Should I buy a Hiperfire 24E Elite trigger? (Each of Hiperfire’s triggers is aimed at a certain set of trigger feel parameters. If you desire a light trigger with a hint of creep and a crisp break, then the 24E might be for you.)
  • Is the Hiperfire Hipertouch 24E trigger  good for hunting? (We think the 24E is more suited to hunting from a stationary position.)
  • Is the Hiperfire 24E trigger  a good upgrade for my duty rifle? (The 24E is a good trigger. However, we prefer a bit heavier, longer trigger pull on a duty rifle.)
  • Where is the review video? Click here for the Gear-Report.com YouTube Channel
hiperfire hipertouch 24E ar-15 trigger review

hiperfire hipertouch 24E ar-15 trigger

Quotable: “Good feel throughout. Clean break.” – Jason

Bench testing

1) Assembly

We received the Hiperfire 24E trigger  as a review sample direct from Hiperfire and installed it in an otherwise complete AR15 lower receiver provided by Anderson Manufacturing. Installation is straight forward thanks to the incredibly well written instructions included in the package and the easy to follow installation videos online at the Hiperfire website. I have yet to find any other trigger with such clear illustrations and step by step instructions as are included with all of the Hiperfire triggers.

Click Here for a detailed video on how to install the Hiperfire Hipertouch 24 triggers.

Overall, I found the 24E easier to install than a stock mil-spec type trigger, mainly because the 24 series triggers are easier to align within the mag well when inserting the trigger and hammer pins. The 24E has more parts. However, the parts are easier to install in the 24 series triggers and the safety selector can remain in place during installation (a big plus). Since I think installation of a mil-spec trigger is manageable for a detail oriented hobbyist, and the 24 series triggers are easier to install than a mil-spec trigger, any trigger from the Hiperfire Hipertouch 24 series is a great option for a DIY upgrade. Just take your time and be sure everything is assembled properly, the hammer spring is oriented the right direction, the shelf on the toggle pins faces outward, etc.

Chosen configuration: The Hiperfire 24E trigger comes with 3 toggle spring options. The toggle springs are an ingenious design that simultaneously alter trigger pull weight and hammer strike energy. Toggle spring option are:

  • Blue = medium trigger pull weight and low-end stock hammer energy
  • Yellow = medium-light trigger pull weight and low-end stock hammer energy
  • Grey/plain = light trigger pull weight and 35% higher hammer energy than stock

We chose the heaviest toggle springs, the unpainted grey springs, which provides the lightest trigger pull and… this part is a bit backwards from how most trigger groups work… the heaviest hammer strike. While we do not have a reliable way to measure hammer energy, this claim by Hiperfire makes perfect sense, as the toggle springs are compressed as the trigger is pulled, countering some of the trigger pull spring energy. When the trigger breaks the toggle springs uncompress, pushing the hammer forward. So, heavier toggle springs = lighter trigger pull and more hammer energy. The best of both worlds. If there is a down side, it is that there are more moving parts within the Hiperfire trigger. However, I can’t see how any parts, aside from the springs, would be likely to wear out or fail under even the heaviest use. While installing the toggle springs takes a steady hand, all of the Gear Report staff that tried it found it easy to master quickly, making in the field trigger spring changes relatively simple and quick.

AR10 AR15 trigger upgrade test hammer drop block

Josejuan testing a trigger with the hammer drop block while Bob installs a trigger in a pistol lower

2) Hammer drop block

Before heading to the range to make expensive noise, we put the Hiperfire hammer drop block (they send us a prototype to test) in the  Anderson Manufacturing lower receiver to test the Hiperfire Hipertouch 24E trigger for proper operation and to get our heads around the trigger’s feel. This was an important step for us, as it allowed each tester to rapidly switch the hammer drop block to different lowers with different triggers to test the trigger feel for accurate comparison. As the middle of the road trigger in the Hiperfire lineup, I wasn’t sure what to expect. The 24E is advertised as having 1/2 the creep of a mil-spec or 24 trigger and a shorter reset, designed for the designated marksman or LE sniper. Just from the hammer drop block testing I agreed that it delivers as advertised. In the field it proved to be a nice balance between having a bit of pre-travel so that a twitch of the trigger finger won’t fire the rifle, but a smooth pull and clean break. More on the field behaviour later.

G.P.S. Trigger pull Scale3) Trigger pull scale
Measuring trigger pull weight is pretty simple:

  1. clamp the magazine well block in the vise,
  2. slide the upper onto the magazine well block. So, the upper is completely stable and not subject to movement during trigger testing,
  3. cock the hammer by hand,
  4. reset the peak weight ring on the trigger pull scale,
  5. place the trigger pull scale test arm on the trigger in the location that you will place your finger when shooting,
  6. pull gently aft on the trigger pull scale until the trigger releases,
  7. record the peak weight from the trigger pull scale
  8. lather, rinse, repeat 2 more times
  9. average the 3 pull weights

The Hiperfire Hipertouch 24E trigger delivered trigger pulls of 3.25 Lb, 3.0 Lb, and 3.0 Lb for an average of 3.08 Lb.

WMDguns.com NiB-X trigger on G.P.S. Trigger pull Scale

A smooth 3 Lb felt about right to our test shooters. Not too heavy, not so light and short that it would be a safety concern in the field. The Hiperfire Hipertouch 24E trigger is designed as DM and sniper trigger and we think the pull weights available are well suited.

4) Pre-travel & Over-travel

We measured total travel the tip of the trigger at almost 1/8 of an inch. That is split nearly 1/16″ of pre-travel, or creep, and 1/16″ of over-travel. Unlike the Hiperfire EDT, which felt very different to me when pulling with my finger tip vs resting the trigger in the first joint at the end of my finger, the 24E proved consistent with either trigger pull method.

 The Results

The Hiperfire Hipertouch 24E trigger is designed to be a long range precision shooting trigger and I like it as such. While it delivers refined feel for a specific type of shooting, it does so at a price that is competitive, if not on the low side, for this segment of the market. Make no mistake, the the Hiperfire Hipertouch 24E is a high-end trigger, even if it’s $215 MSRP is on the low-end vs competition.

AR trigger upgrade WMD Guns NiB-X trigger 100 yards bench100 yards

All 5 shooters slung five rounds of American Eagle 55 grain .223 Remington at small numbered paper targets from benches with shooting rests or sandbags at 100 yards to get a feel for how the Hiperfire Hipertouch 24E trigger performed under slow, controlled fire. Given that this is what the Hipertouch 24 Elite is designed for, it performed well. It just worked. No drama, very little wondering when it would break, just a light, repeatable trigger pull every time. I have the 24E earmarked for a future AR10/.308 rifle build.

 Short range tactical carbine

Chris from Three Pillars Shooting, LLC and Bob, our other NRA instructor collaborated to run the team through basic 3-10 yard quick target acquisition, rapid shot strings and short mag shoot-reload-shoot drills. Given that this usage is where we might expect a slightly heavier trigger to inspire more confidence (you know, since we were shooting from an open firing line 5 shooters wide, about an arms length apart), the test team offered no criticisms of the Hipertouch 24 Elite trigger. However, some of the competition triggers felt a bit light in this shooting scenario.

ar trigger upgrade review close range carbine shooting40 yard plate rack

A 2 shooter duel to see who could hit the most of the 6 plates of 8 inch diameter in a horizontal row at 40 yards. Similar to the tactical carbine shooting, the Hiperfire Hipertouch Elite fire control group put in a respectable showing in the plate rack duels. It didn’t feel like the quickest trigger, but was closer in feel to the specialized competition fire control groups than the feel of the mil-spec based triggers. I am a bit surprised to say that the 24E strikes me as the best compromise for the casual, recreational shooter that splits time between bench shooting and the more mobile action shooting disciplines. I really expected the Hiperfire EDT to be my choice for that jack-of-all-trades role. In the end, the lighter pull of the 24 E won me over from the EDT.

 40 yard steel silhouettes

This was less formal with 2 shooters competing to see who could put a string of shots on their steel silhouettes most rapidly. In range testing we found that the competition triggers excelled with their ultralight trigger pulls and ultra-short resets. As with the 40 yard plate rack duels, the Hiperfire Hipertouch 24E trigger felt more deliberate and crisp than any of the lower priced options that we tested. I was not able to find the sweet spot in the reset of the 24 Elite trigger in the limited rounds we had available during our testing. So, the pre-travel slowed me down a bit compared to the shorter /non-existent pre-travel in the competition triggers. Maybe more time on the 24E will make me faster as my finger gets accustomed to the reset point of the 24E. Seems like a good reason to take it back o the range soon. :)

Overall

Gear Score
Gearswww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.com
My choice for the best multi-use trigger in our big AR trigger upgrade test.

hiperfire AR15 AR10 trigger upgrade full lineHiperfire

As noted in our AR Trigger Test Preview, Terry Bender, the Hiperfire CEO wasn’t just willing to pit his triggers against the competition, he was EAGER. While every other manufacturer in our big AR Trigger test sent one model of trigger for evaluation, Hiperfire sent all 5 current production triggers. Terry, a mechanical engineer by training, created a very innovative design for the 24E series triggers, adjusting the geometry and mechanisms within the AR trigger group. My experience with the complete line of Hiperfire 24 triggers is consistent with how Terry describes them: “The triggers are differentiated best by the amount of creep to meet any preference.” However, I would add that the ability to dial in the trigger pull weight by swapping the springs is nice also.

GearReport logo Round AR15

The Big AR Trigger Upgrade Test

We tested 9 AR platform trigger upgrades from 5 different manufacturers to identify:

  • Which AR trigger upgrade is the best value?
  • Which AR-15 and AR-10 triggers are best suited for hunting, competitive shooting, personal defense, duty rifle?
  • Which AR trigger do we like best?

Starting with a just barely broken-in “mil-spec” trigger group as our “control”, our team of 5 testers assembled and dry fired each AR FCG on the hammer drop block to get a feel for each trigger, measured trigger pull weight with a trigger pull gauge, then shot each trigger in long range, tactical carbine, and competitive shooting situations to assess each fire control group in a real-world setting. We shot nearly 2,000 rounds down a combined 6 AR uppers so we could provide the most comprehensive trigger upgrade review possible.

Huge thanks to Ammunition Supply Company, who kicked in 2,000 rounds of bulk 55 grain ammo for this test.

You can read more about the hiperfire AR15 AR10 trigger upgrade and the other triggers in the test in our full AR trigger upgrade review.

 

 

1

Hiperfire Hipertouch EDT AR15 AR10 Enhanced Duty Trigger Review

Some questions we will shed light on in this review (and our quick answer in parenthesis): How does the Hiperfire EDT trigger compare to other AR triggers? (Reasonably well, even compared […]

hiperfire AR15 AR10 trigger upgrade packageSome questions we will shed light on in this review (and our quick answer in parenthesis):

Quotable: “For its intended use vs value I give it a 4″ – Jason  (on a 5 point scale with 1=terrible & 5=love)

hiperfire AR15 AR10 trigger upgradeBench testing

1) Assembly

We received the Hiperfire EDT trigger  as a review sample direct from Hiperfire and installed it in an otherwise complete AR15 lower receiver provided by Anderson Manufacturing. Installation is simple and straight forward thanks to the incredibly well written instructions included in the package and the easy to follow installation videos online at the Hiperfire website. I have yet to find any other trigger with such clear illustrations and step by step instructions as are included with all of the Hiperfire triggers.

In a nutshell (simplified, so refer to the official instructions to be sure each step is completed properly):

  1. install the disconnector spring
  2. install the trigger spring
  3. align the disconnector on the trigger
  4. drop the trigger into the trigger well
  5. use the alignment pin to assist in aligning the trigger and disconnector pin holes with the mag well trigger pin holes
  6. install the trigger pin
  7. install the hammer spring on the hammer
  8. place the hammer in the trigger well
  9. use the alignment pin to assist in aligning the hammer pin hole with the mag well hammer pin holes
  10. install the hammer pin

Overall, I found the EDT not as easy to install as the 24 series Hiperfire triggers. The EDT has fewer parts. However, the spring tension is such that aligning the disconnector and trigger with the trigger pin was more difficult than the 24 series triggers. Thankfully, Hiperfire included a small rod about 1.5 inches long with a taper at one end. This “alignment pin” was a huge help in getting all of the holes aligned so that the trigger pin could be inserted, Installation was about the same as a stock mil-spec AR trigger. Not difficult, and it seems manageable for a detail oriented hobbyist.

Chosen configuration: The Hiperfire EDT trigger comes with 2 Hammer Spring options. The Green spring is reported to deliver a trigger pull weight of not less than 4.5 lb , while the Red spring is reported to deliver a trigger pull weight of not less than 5.5 lb. We chose the lighter Green spring for this installation.

AR10 AR15 trigger upgrade test hammer drop block

Josejuan testing a trigger with the haner test block while Bob installs a trigger in a pistol lower

2) Hammer drop block

Before heading to the range to make expensive noise, we put the hammer drop block in the  Anderson Manufacturing lower receiver to test the Hiperfire Hipertouch EDT trigger for proper operation and to get our heads around the trigger’s feel. This was an important step for us, as it allowed each tester to rapidly switch the hammer drop block to different lowers and test the trigger feel for accurate comparison. We expected the Hiperfire EDT trigger to feel quite a bit like a mil-spec trigger. However, we found the Hipertouch EDT trigger trigger to be noticeably better than a stock mil-spec trigger in trigger pull weight, crispness and smoothness.

3) Trigger pull scale

G.P.S. Trigger pull ScaleMeasuring trigger pull weight is pretty simple:

  1. clamp the magazine well block in the vise,
  2. slide the upper onto the magazine well block. So, the upper is completely stable and not subject to movement during trigger testing,
  3. cock the hammer by hand,
  4. reset the peak weight ring on the trigger pull scale,
  5. place the trigger pull scale test arm on the trigger in the location that you will place your finger when shooting,
  6. pull gently aft on the trigger pull scale until the trigger releases,
  7. record the peak weight from the trigger pull scale
  8. lather, rinse, repeat 2 more times
  9. average the 3 pull weights

The Hiperfire Hipertouch EDT trigger delivered trigger pulls of 5.0 Lb, 5.5 Lb, and 5.0 Lb for an average of 5.17 Lb.

WMDguns.com NiB-X trigger on G.P.S. Trigger pull Scale

Pretty respectable for a Duty Trigger that competes head to head with mil-spec triggers, where average trigger pull weights in the 7 Lb range are considered normal. However, the Hiperfire EDT is the heaviest trigger pull of any of the trigger upgrades in our test pool. We don’t say this as a negative. Each AR trigger upgrade that we test is designed with a specific purpose. The Hiperfire Hipertouch EDT trigger is designed as a workhorse to be carried in situations were an ultra-light trigger pull would be a liability.

4) Creep & Overtravel

We measured total travel the tip of the trigger at nearly 3/16 of an inch. That is split nearly 1/8″ of creep and 1/16″ of overtravel. Although I have to admit that the EDT felt very different to me when pulling with my finger tip vs resting the trigger in the first joint at the end of my finger. With the finger tip I could perceive practically no creep at all with a very crisp break. With the trigger in the first joint of my finger and a slow pull I could get a bit of mushy creep before hitting the wall. In practical terms, when shooting quickly with a firm trigger pull the EDT feels great. It is not designed to be a long range precision shooting trigger, which may explain the different feel when shooting it with a slow easy pull.

 The Results

Given the target market for the Hiperfire Hipertouch EDT trigger, we expected it to be a better-than-stock option for most tasks and a good budget upgrade. However, our test pool is littered with highly refined fire control groups and competition triggers. Can a sub $100 trigger upgrade really be expected to compete with such high-end AR parts?
AR trigger upgrade WMD Guns NiB-X trigger 100 yards

100 yards

All 5 shooters slung five rounds of American Eagle 55 grain .223 Remington at small numbered paper targets from benches with shooting rests or sandbags at 100 yards to get a feel for how the Hiperfire Hipertouch EDT trigger performed under slow, controlled fire. While I noted a bit of mushy creep on one of the 5 shots, the opinions of the other testers were varied. Comments about creep ranged from: “More creep than I would allow in a personal rifle” to “none”.  Reset was referred to as positive, clean, crisp, audible.

 Short range tactical carbine

Chris from Three Pillars Shooting, LLC and Bob, our other NRA instructor collaborated to run the team through basic 3-10 yard quick target acquisition, rapid shot strings and short mag shoot-reload-shoot drills. Similar to the WMD trigger, in this scenario the Hiperfire Hipertouch EDT trigger performed very well, with a great balance between trigger pull weight and a solid trigger feel. The heavier pull of the EDT was noticeable. However, some of the competition triggers felt a bit light in this shooting scenario. Given that tactical carbine work is a good fit for the design of the EDT, this is a good place to mention how Hiperfire overcame a common problem with mil-spec fire control groups: debris in accumulating in the disconnector. The addition of what I will call drainage holes in the disconnector slot allow carbon and other debris someplace to go where it won’t interfere with the mechanical function of the fire control group. Hiperfire calls this “self cleaning” and it sounds like a good description to me. There is also more clearance under the trigger rear of the trigger to reduce the likelihood that dirt, blown primers or anything else will prevent  the trigger from returning and allowing the hammer to reset. Since the Enhanced Duty Trigger is designed for use in more challenging environments, under more critical circumstances, the seemingly small improvements could make a big difference.

40 yard plate rack

A 2 shooter duel to see who could hit the most of the 6 plates of 8 inch diameter in a horizontal row at 40 yards. Again, similar to the WMD trigger, the Hiperfire Hipertouch EDT fire control group put in a respectable showing in the plate rack duels, but finally started to show a bit of disadvantage against the lighter, shorter-reset competition triggers. While still a massive improvement over the stock mil-spec FCG, the Hipertouch EDT trigger felt a bit heavy and slow compared to the highly tuned triggers in the test.

 40 yard steel silhouettes

This was less formal with 2 shooters competing to see who could put a string of shots on their steel silhouettes most rapidly. We found that the competition triggers excelled with their ultralight trigger pulls and ultra-short resets. As with the 40 yard plate rack duels, the Hiperfire Hipertouch EDT trigger felt smooth and solid, inspiring confidence, but also felt a bit heavy and slow.

Overall

Gear Score
Gearswww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.com
Great trigger when used as designed.

hiperfire AR15 AR10 trigger upgrade full lineHiperfire

As noted in our AR Trigger Test Preview, Terry Bender, the Hiperfire CEO wasn’t just willing to pit his triggers against the competition, he was EAGER While every other manufacturer in our big AR Trigger test sent one model of trigger for evaluation, Hiperfire sent all 5 current production triggers. Terry, a mechanical engineer by training, created a very innovative design for the 24 series triggers, adjusting the geometry and mechanisms within the AR trigger group.

GearReport logo Round AR15

The Big AR Trigger Upgrade Test

We tested 9 AR platform trigger upgrades from 5 different manufacturers to identify:

  • Which AR trigger upgrade is the best value?
  • Which AR-15 and AR-10 triggers are best suited for hunting, competitive shooting, personal defense, duty rifle?
  • Which AR trigger do we like best?

Starting with a just barely broken-in “mil-spec” trigger group as our “control”, our team of 5 testers assembled and dry fired each AR FCG on the hammer drop block to get a feel for each trigger, measured trigger pull weight with a trigger pull gauge, then shot each trigger in long range, tactical carbine, and competitive shooting situations to assess each fire control group in a real-world setting. We shot nearly 2,000 rounds down a combined 6 AR uppers so we could provide the most comprehensive trigger upgrade review possible.

Huge thanks to Ammunition Supply Company, who kicked in 2,000 rounds of bulk 55 grain ammo for this test.

You can read more about the AR15 AR10 trigger upgrade and the other triggers in the test in our full AR trigger upgrade review.

 

 

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